Europlanet Partners Present… INAF

Europlanet Partners Present… INAF

Beneficiaries of the Europlanet 2024 Research Infrastructure (RI) project used the forum of the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2020 to present their activities and research on planetary topics. In this series, we have compiled playlists of EPSC2020 video presentations to showcase the contributions to Europlanet 2024 RI and wider research by our project partners.

This month, we feature presentations involving researchers from INAF, Italy.

The following playlist features open access EPSC2020 scientific oral video presentations involving researchers from INAF:

Details of open access oral presentations with INAF involvement:

Small Bodies Sessions

Terrestrial Planets Sessions

Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems Sessions

Outreach, Amateur Astronomy and Diversity Sessions

Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling Sessions

See video presentations from other institutions in the Europlanet Partners Present… series.

Find out more about Europlanet 2024 RI and the project participants.

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of ODAA (Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of ODAA (Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy) sessions

ODAA1 | ODAA2 | ODAA3 | ODAA4 | ODAA5 | ODAA6 | ODAA7

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 ODAA (Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

ODAA1 – Arts for Planetary Science Outreach: Sandboxes and Inspirations

The session explores the role of arts in the wide sense – literature, theatre, movies, games, comics, paintings, sculptures, etc. – in communicating planetary science and related fields. Art can make the sciences more relatable and understandable to the general public, increase their appeal, use narratives to engage emotion and long-term memory and also act as inspiration sources and sandboxes for testing ideas. Board as well as video games and RPGs bringing science closer to the players; comic books depicting seismic waves and magnetic fields; book anthologies of science fiction and fact; theatre revolving around science concepts; space art contests for pupils; all of these and other similar projects would be welcome. In previous years, art-related projects were usually filed under open planetary science or new technologies and local communities, but they weren’t easily found in one place together and didn’t have a specialized session to draw more submissions, which both might hamper discussion, idea exchange and drawing practical conclusions. This session is the place to bring these projects together and enable new ones to spring from there.

‘One argument often put forward in support in projects designed to bring artists and researchers together is that resultant “artwork”, whether this is a performance work, an audio, a book or visual artwork, will appeal to different audiences than those traditionally interested in scientific research. Clearly there are many people who participate in a wide range of cultural opportunities including both artistic events and more traditional research communication activities, but it has been argued that an arts-based approach can reach beyond the traditional demographic interested in a specific research area.’ [“Creative research communication, theory and practice” – C. Wilkinson & E. Weitkamp]

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41593 

Convener: Julie Nekola Novakova | Co-conveners: Caterina Boccato, Andrea Brunello

Abstract submission

ODAA2 – Diversity and Inclusiveness in Planetary Sciences

The benefits of diversity and inclusiveness in the scientific community are incontrovertible. Following the success of previous years, this session aims to foster debate within the planetary sciences community about the reasons behind under-representation of different groups (gender, cultural, ethnic origin and national) and best practices to make the research environment more inclusive identifying and addressing barriers to equality.

We invite abstracts focusing on: under-representation (gender, cultural, ethnic origin and nationality biases) supported by statistics and data; outreach and education activities to reach broad and diverse audiences, best practices to support inclusiveness; and case studies on mentoring and bias-concerned activities. Data and initiatives related to COVID are strongly encouraged.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41594 

Convener: Arianna Piccialli | Co-conveners: Lena Noack, Andrea Opitz

Abstract submission

ODAA3 – Planetary Science Education

Planetary science is an often neglected part of formal education and yet it is one of the most popular natural science topics among children. This session explores the methods and tools developed for and by educators working in formal education from elementary to high school levels, and informal education from museum pedagogy to activity books. The aim of the session is to make these methods and tools visible for both other educators and the scientific community.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41640 

Convener: Peter Fuchs | Co-conveners: Henrik Hargitai, Attila Jeremias Kiraly

Abstract submission

ODAA4 – Open planetary science for effective knowledge co-creation and dissemination

Knowledge creation is a collaborative process including synergies between different disciplines, communities and stakeholders. The framework of open science is also connected to the involvement of people outside academia, such as amateur societies, school students, corporate partners etc. Open science has a variety of aspects and applications. What are the efforts done in the field of planetary sciences to establish and increase openness? To what degree planetary science researchers and practitioners endeavour accessibility within the various communities – academics and non-academics? During this session these and other relevant questions will be addressed through the presentation of open planetary science projects, tools, data and platforms. Furthermore, the current status and the potential for future efforts towards an open and public planetary science scheme will be discussed. Building upon the success of the session in EPSC2020, planetary scientists, researchers and other stakeholders are welcome to present new projects and the developments of previous ones, in the context of promoting open & public science. Moreover, the session will include a discussion on the establishment of an open science forum for planetary sciences.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41659 

Convener: Anastasia Kokori | Co-conveners: Caterina Boccato, Angelos Tsiaras

Abstract submission

ODAA5 – Professional-Amateur collaborations in small bodies, terrestrial and giant planets, exoplanets, and ground-based support of space missions

Amateur astronomy has evolved dramatically over recent years. A motivated amateur, with his/her backyard instrument and available software is nowadays capable of getting high-resolution planetary images in different wavelengths (better than many professional observatories could achieve 15 years ago). Topics well covered by amateur astronomers include: high-resolution imaging of solar system planets, high-precision photometry of stellar occultations by minor objects and giant planets’ atmospheres, satellites’ mutual phenomena and high-precision photometry of exoplanet transits. Additionally amateurs use dedicated all-sky cameras or radio-antennae to provide continuous meteor-detection coverage of the sky near their location and they start to contribute to spectroscopic studies of solar system objects.

Hundreds of regular observers are sharing their work providing very valuable data to professional astronomers. This is very valuable at a time when professional astronomers face increasing competition accessing observational resources. Additionally, networks of amateur observers can react at very short notice when triggered by a new event occurring on a solar system object requiring observations, or can contribute to a global observation campaign along with professional telescopes.

Moreover, some experienced amateur astronomers use advanced methods for analysing their data meeting the requirements of professional researchers, thereby facilitating regular and close collaboration with professionals. Often this leads to publication of results in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Examples include planetary meteorology of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune or Venus; meteoroid or bolide impacts on Jupiter; asteroid studies, cometary or exoplanet research.

Additionally, since July 2016, the NASA spacecraft Juno explores Jupiter’s inner structure from a series of long elliptical orbits with close flybys of the planet. To understand the atmospheric dynamics of the planet at the time of Juno, NASA collaborates with amateur astronomers observing the Giant Planet. The collaborative effort between Juno and amateurs is linked to the visual camera onboard Juno: JunoCam. Juno showcases an exciting opportunity for amateurs to provide an unique dataset that is used to plan the high-resolution observations from JunoCam and that advances our knowledge of the atmospheric dynamics of the Giant planet Jupiter. Contribution of amateurs range from their own images to Junocam images processing and support on selecting by vote the feature to be observed during the flybys.

This session will showcase results from amateur astronomers, working either by themselves or in collaboration with members of the professional community. In addition, members from both communities will be invited to share their experiences of pro-am partnerships and offer suggestions on how these should evolve in the future.
Oral and poster presentations are welcome.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41660 

Convener: Marc Delcroix | Co-conveners: Wolfgang Beisker, Ulyana Dyudina, Ricardo Hueso, John Rogers, Helen Usher

Abstract submission

ODAA6 – The role of citizen science in scientific research: across disciplines and beyond scientists

Citizen science projects, while existing for a long time, have reached new levels of impact on society and allow to engage the public and connect citizen to professional researchers. In this session, we invite papers from scientists, educators as well as those who design, facilitate, evaluate or fund citizen science projects. Topics may include methodology, applications of citizen science to enhancing outreach, transformative approaches to science education.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41700 

Convener: Stijn Calders | Co-convener: Arianna Piccialli

Abstract submission

ODAA7 – Africa-European collaborations in planetary science

The African Union has developed a continental African Space Strategy (2017) that is based on the African Space Policy, which provides the principles for the establishment of a formal African space programme. This strategy is intended to support the Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa 2024 and other relevant continental Strategies, such as the Education Strategy for Africa (CESA 2016-2025), and thus contribute to the achievement of Agenda 2063. 

The African Space Strategy suggests that space science and technology can have an impact in combatting the serious challenges that African countries are facing in ensuring the adequate provision of basic necessities for their growing population.

Several large planetary and space science projects expected to start in the very near future in Africa, including the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and the Botswana Satellite (Botswana Sat-1). The next generation of African scientists, leaders, and entrepreneurs will be part of a growing Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) labour market that currently has a skills shortage in the areas of remote sensing from space, planetary geology, astronomy, and astrophysics. 

The Pan-Africa Planetary and Space Science Network (PAPSSN), launched in February, aims to improve access to high-quality STEM education, with a particular emphasis on planetary and space science. The Europlanet 2024 RI project also places a high priority on building collaboration with planetary science communities in Africa, and has recently published a strategy as a first step towards a community-led roadmap for global collaboration as part of Europlanet’s future development as both a Research Infrastructure and as a Society 

In this session, we invite members of the community to submit abstracts highlighting developments in planetary science and related fields in Africa, and opportunities for collaboration between Africa and Europe.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41770 

Conveners: Barbara Cavalazzi, Fulvio Franchi | Co-conveners: Anita Heward, Valentina Marcheselli, Nigel Mason

Abstract submission

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of EXO (Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of EXO (Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems) sessions

EXO1 | EXO3 | EXO5 | EXO7 | SB10 | OPS5 | MITM6 | MITM7 | TP5 | TP21

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 EXO (Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

EXO1 – Zooming In On Planet Formation

The inner regions of planet forming disks surrounding young stars are key to our understanding of the formation of rocky, Earth-like planets and super-Earths. We know from exoplanet surveys that such planets are abundantly present around low mass stars. Rocky planets are essential ingredients in the quest for life outside the solar system. Understanding their properties and formation history is key to our efforts to put the solar system in perspective.

Investigations of the outer regions of the accretion disk provide us with information on the distribution of volatile material and ices in planetary systems, and studies on disk properties, on evolved cold, gaseous or sub-Neptune planets, as well as migration studies of planets leading to various different system architectures (e.g. to hot Jupiters close to their host star) help us to better understand the evolution of our own solar system. 

We invite abstracts from different disciplines working on planet formation, including for example observations of planet forming disks, recent or on-going exoplanet surveys, theoretical and computational models, as well as comparative studies using solar system data from exploration missions, meteorite analysis and remote sensing.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41645 

Co-organized by TP

Convener: Lena Noack | Co-conveners: Myriam Benisty, Mario Flock, Inga Kamp, Yamila Miguel, Rens Waters

Abstract submission

EXO3 – Exoplanet observations, modelling and experiments: Characterization of their atmospheres

The field of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and planetary science. Ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions have already discovered more than 4000 planets with many more detections expected in the near future. A key challenge is now the characterisation of their atmospheres in order to answer to the questions: what are these worlds actually like and what processes govern their formation and evolution?

To answer these questions, a broad range of skills and expertise are required, stretching from Solar System science to statistical astrophysics, from ground-based observations to spacecraft measurements, and atmospheric/interior/orbital modelling. The numerous studies conducted in the past twenty years have unveiled a large diversity of atmospheres, from ultra-hot Jupiters to temperate super-Earths. The next generation of space and ground based facilities, including current high-resolution instruments (e.g. ESPRESSO, Spirou, CHEOPS, IGRINS, E-ELT, JWST, and Ariel) will characterise this multifarious population in stunning detail and challenge our current understanding. Both theoretical works and experimental measurements are required to prepare for such a change of scale.

This session will focus on the atmospheric characterisation of exoplanets and the conveners welcome any abstract related to this subject.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41612 

Convener: Olivia Venot | Co-conveners: Monika Lendl, Giuseppe Morello, Vivien Parmentier, Ingo Waldmann

Abstract submission

EXO5 – Synergies between techniques for characterising exoplanets from space and ground-based facilities

The characterisation of exoplanets is among the most active and rapidly advancing fields in modern astrophysics. An increasing number of observing techniques have enabled the characterisation of exoplanet system properties and provided access to the planetary atmospheres (chemical composition, thermal state and dynamics). Recently, combined analyses using different types of observations have outperformed the standard approaches, e.g. enabling precise constraints on the chemical abundances and elemental ratios in their atmospheres, or measurements of both the star and planet spin-orbit angles.

The goal of this session is to inspire the cooperation between specialised teams to overcome the limits of the fragmented data analyses and to break degeneracies in their interpretation. Contributions are invited to present new methods and/or analyses that combine different kind of observations for comprehensive exoplanet characterisation.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41611 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Giuseppe Morello | Co-conveners: Camilla Danielski, Pierre-Olivier Lagage, Lisa Nortmann, Enric Palle, Fei Yan

Abstract submission

EXO7 – Future instruments to detect and characterise extrasolar planets and their environment.

Exoplanets are being discovered in large numbers thanks to recent and ongoing surveys using state-of-the-art instrumentation from the ground and from space. In the next years, new astronomical instruments will further scout our Galaxy to overcome the current observational biases in the search of alien worlds, to gain a deeper understanding of the chemical and physical properties of both exoplanets and their environments, and to unveil the processes of formation and evolution of planets and their atmospheres.

The goal of this session is to bring together the instrumentation and observational communities that are underpinning the future of this field. Contributions are invited to review ongoing programmes of exoplanet and circumstellar discs discovery and characterisation, to update on the progress of planned instrumentation programmes, and to present innovative ideas for future instrumentation.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41610 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Camilla Danielski | Co-conveners: Elodie Choquet, Paul Eccleston, Enzo Pascale, Subhajit Sarkar

Abstract submission

SB10 – Planetary Rings – Protoplanetary Disks

Thanks to the advancement of observational techniques from Earth and space, our knowledge of planetary ring systems and protoplanetary disks has greatly improved. While these two classes of objects differ by orders of magnitude in dimension and evolutionary stage, they offer a unique opportunity to investigate common dynamical processes that can shed light on the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems. Although rings are common companions of the outer planets in our solar system, so far we do not yet have firm evidence of similar structures around exoplanets. In this respect, the characteristics of solar system rings can be used as a benchmark to tune ongoing exo-ring surveys. Conversely, high-angular resolution images obtained with new instruments such as the ALMA interferometer and SPHERE on VLT have revealed that protoplanetary discs are also characterized by substructures such
as gaps and narrow rings. The formation of these rings can be explained by the dynamical interaction of the gas and dust in the disc with one or more embedded planets. Similar processes are also common in planetary rings, as revealed by the unprecedented spatial
resolution of Cassini observations at Saturn. In this session we invite abstracts related to both theoretical and observational studies of
planetary rings and protoplanetary disks, as well as exo-ring research.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41672 

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Convener: Philip D. Nicholson | Co-conveners: Gianrico Filacchione, Linda Podio, Claudia Toci

Abstract submission

OPS5 – Aerosols and clouds in planetary atmospheres

Atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles are found in every atmosphere of the solar system, as well as, in exoplanets. Depending on their size, shape, chemical composition, latent heat, and distribution, their effect on the radiation budget varies drastically and is difficult to predict. When organic, aerosols also carry a strong prebiotic interest reinforced by the presence of heavy atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur.

The aim of the session is to gather presentations on these complex objects for both terrestrial and giant planet atmospheres, including the special cases of Titan’s and Pluto’s hazy atmospheres. All research aspects from their production and evolution processes, their observation/detection, to their fate and atmospheric impact are welcomed, including laboratory investigations and modeling.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41680 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Panayotis Lavvas | Co-conveners: Nathalie Carrasco, Anni Määttänen

Abstract submission

MITM6 – (Exo-)planetary magnetospheres

The emphasis of the session is on all aspects of plasma physics and interactions of solar and stellar wind interactions with planets and exoplanets, including: (a) magnetospheric dynamics, aurorae, and radio emissions (b) potential impact of star-(exo-)planet coupling on habitability, (c) comparative studies between Solar System planets and exoplanets. We welcome contributions relying on space-based or ground-based observations as well as theoretical modelling and simulations.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41604 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Corentin Louis | Co-convener: Nicolas André

Abstract submission

MITM7 – Developments in the detection and characterization of planetary atmospheres

The study of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres involves a wide range of techniques and disciplines which provide crucial information about their vertical layering, their dynamics and chemistry, the role of condensable species in their meteorology. It is also a key contribution to the understanding of planet and moon climates and of their potential as habitable worlds, particularly in the case of exoplanets. The techniques involved in such investigations include, among other, ground-based telescopic observations, computer simulations and numerical models, and direct spacecraft observations (orbiters, landers, entry probes). 
We welcome presentations reviewing the current state-of-the-art techniques for the observation and investigation of (exo-)planetary atmospheres (composition, chemistry, dynamics), discussing the technical challenges and recent developments, and the implications for the potential habitability of exoplanet candidates.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41605 

Co-organized by TP/OPS/EXO

Convener: Michel Blanc | Co-conveners: Manuel Scherf, Thomas Smith

Abstract submission

TP5 – Astrobiology

Astrobiology is the study of whether present or past life exists elsewhere in the universe. To understand how life can begin in space, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. This session seeks papers that offer existing/novel theoretical models or computational works that address the chemical and environmental conditions relevant to astrobiology on terrestrial planets/moons or ocean worlds, along with other theoretical, experimental, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in the Universe. This includes work related to prebiotic chemistry, the chemistry of early life, the biogeochemistry of life’s interaction with its environment, chemistry associated with biosignatures and their false positives, and chemistry pertinent to conditions that could possibly harbor life (e.g. Titan, Enceladus, Europa, TRAPPIST-1, habitable exoplanets, etc.). Understanding how the planetary environment has influenced the evolution of life and how biological processes have changed the environment is an essential part of any study of the origin and search for signs of life. Earth analogues experiments/instruments test and/or simulation campaigns and limits of life studies are included as well as one of the main topics of this session. Major Space Agencies identified planetary habitability and the search for evidence of life as a key component of their scientific missions in the next two decades. The development of instrumentation and technology to support the search for complex organic molecules/sings of life/biosignatures and the endurance of life in space environments is critical to define unambiguous approaches to life detection over a broad range of planetary environments.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41616 

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Convener: Felipe Gómez | Co-convener: Pamela Conrad

Abstract submission

TP21 – The emergence of Life in our Solar System and Beyond

This session seeks papers on the biological, physicochemical, astrophysical, and paleontological studies of the living-matter origination problem, mechanism, conditions necessary and sufficient for living-matter origination and development on the Earth and other celestial objects; promising celestial objects for the living-matter occurrence, and other experimental, theoretical, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in our Solar System and beyond are welcomed.
This includes work related to theme of the Origins of Life to study interstellar chemistry, meteorites and comets chemistry as well as the chemistry of planets. A central issue in the research on the emergence of life is the paradoxical role of water in pre-biotic chemistry. Infact,on the one hand, water is essential for all known life, on the other hand it is highly destructive for key biomolecules such as nucleic and polypeptides.
A truly interdisciplinary approach is needed to delve into the core of the issue of emergence of life, because in addition to physics and chemistry it is also need to deploy a number of other sciences. We rely on contribution caming from mathematical or philosophical perspectives not only on astrobiology moreover we think that a part of the answers may lie in scientists who working on cancer research, genetics, space exploration paleontology who are not necessarily involved in this field. I argue that synthetic biology field, challenging most accepted definitions of life too, might also shed some novel and interesting perspectives on one of the most puzzling unanswered questions of science.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41767 

Co-organized by EXO

Convener: Rosanna del Gaudio | Co-conveners: Terence Kee, Frank Trixler

Abstract submission

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of MITM (Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of MITM (Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling) sessions

MITM1 | MITM2 | MITM3 | MITM4 | MITM5 | MITM6 | MITM7 | MITM8 | MITM9 | TP6 | TP7 | TP16 | TP19 | EXO5 | EXO7 | SB7 | OPS2 | OPS3 | OPS6 |

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 MITM (Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

MITM1 – Planetary Space Weather

The emphasis of the session is on all aspects of the conditions in the Sun, solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas that extend the concepts of space weather and space situational awareness to other planets in our Solar System than Earth, and in particular to spacecraft that travel through it. Abstracts on space- and ground-based data analysis, theoretical modeling and simulations of planetary space weather are welcomed. The description of new services accessible to the research community, space agencies, and industrial partners planning for space missions and addressing the effects of the environment on components and systems are also strongly encouraged. This session will also summarize the planetary space weather services developed during Europlanet RI H2020 as well as introduce the future ones to be developed by the Sun-Planet Interactions Digital Environment on Request Work Package during Europlanet RI H2024.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41597 

Convener: Nicolas André | Co-conveners: Sae Aizawa, Andrea Opitz

Abstract submission

MITM2 – Small satellite and dedicated instruments: a new opportunity for planetary exploration

This session will highlight planetary science and space mission concepts based on small satellites. Recent advances in small platforms make it possible for small satellites, including CubeSats, to be considered as independent or complementary elements in planetary exploration missions, for example the small probes as part of the Hayabusa 2, DART and Hera mission. Presentations on Deep Space Planetary CubeSats, e.g. the small satellites accompanying the F-class ESA mission Comet Interceptor and those selected or proposed for the NASA SIMPLEX program are welcomed. Concepts for future mission may either be an augmentation to larger missions or as stand-alone missions of their own. We encourage presentations on new Planetary science mission architectures and associated technologies, as well as dedicated instrumentation that can be developed for these applications.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41598 

Co-organized by SB

Conveners: Patricia Beauchamp, John Brucato | Co-conveners: Marilena Amoroso, Vincenzo Della Corte, Iaroslav Iakubivskyi, Simone Pirrotta

Abstract submission

MITM3 – Future instruments and sustainable outposts for deep space, Moon and Mars

This merged session (co-sponsored by space agencies, ILEWG EuroMoonMars & IAF ITACCUS) will cover the preparation for future missions and sustainable outposts in deep space, Moon and Earth . It will be interdisciplinary , open to new stakeholders towards Moon and Mars Villages, and include subsessions:
1) Future instruments for deep space and lunar science NASA, ESA, JAXA, ISRO, KARI and other Agencies have active Lunar science instruments programs and concepts. The Artemis and the Gateway programs have also generated a new drive to develop Lunar surface science instruments and technology demonstrations. Ahead of the human return to the Moon, commercial landers are expected to deliver science packages to the Lunar surface as early as 2021. Teams of Instruments already selected for flight as well as concept being developed are encouraged to submit abstracts and get feedback from the wider community.

2) Sustainable outposts for deep space, Moon and Mars.
We invite contributions on various uses of Moon, Mars and planetary outposts : science, technology, international cooperation, resource utilisation, economic development, human/robotic partnership, innovation, inspiration, education, entertainment, tourism, culture and societal benefits. We invite scientists, engineers, designers, architects, astronauts, research agencies, industries from (new) space and non-space to participate. We shall also discuss habitats projects for analogue simulations such as MDRS, Intl Moonbase Alliance HI-SEAS, LunAres, IgLuna, ESA Luna, MAMBA, EMMIHS, ILEWG EuroMoonMars.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41599 

Convener: Bernard Foing | Co-conveners: Marc Heemskerk, Sabrina Kerber, Agata Kolodziejczyk, Tai Sik Lee, Michaela Musilova,Roxana Perrier, Henk Rogers, Carol Stoker

Abstract submission

MITM4 – Tools, Databases and Data Analytics for Solar and Planetary Sciences at the Big Data Era

Modern space missions, ground telescopes and modeling facilities are producing huge amount of data. A new era of data distribution and access procedures is now starting with interoperable infrastructures and big data technologies. Long term archives exist for telescopic and space-borne observations but high-level functions need to be setup on top of theses repositories to make Solar and Planetary Science data more accessible and to favor interoperability. Results of simulations and reference laboratory data also need to be integrated to support and interpret the observations.

The Virtual Observatory (VO) standards developed in Astronomy may be adapted in the field of Planetary Science to develop interoperability, including automated workflows to process related data from different sources. Other communities have developed their own standards (GIS for surfaces, SPASE for space plasma, PDS4 for planetary mission archives…) and an effort to make them interoperable is starting.

Planetary Science Informatics and Data Analytics (PSIDA) are also offering new ways to exploit the science out of planetary data through modern techniques such as: data exploitation and collaboration platforms, visualisation and analysis applications, artificial intelligence and machine learning, data fusion and integration supported by new big data architecture and management infrastructure, potentially being hosted by cloud and scalable computing.

We call for contributions presenting progresses in the fields of Solar and Planetary science databases, tools and data analytics. We encourage contributors to focus on science use cases and on international standard implementation, such as those proposed by Europlanet/VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access) the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance), the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium), the IPDA (International Planetary Data Alliance) or the IHDEA (International Heliophysics Data Environment Alliance), as well as applications linked to the EOSC (European Open Science Cloud) infrastructure.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41600 

Convener: Baptiste Cecconi | Co-conveners: Sebastien Besse, Andrea Nass

Abstract submission

MITM5 – Geomapping other worlds

Geological maps on Earth are planar representations of a territory showing the composition and the ages of rocks and deposits at its surface, and from which it is inferable its geological evolution as well as the related subsurface structure and lithology. On planetary bodies geological maps can not yet be so complete in terms of compositional information as geological maps on Earth and are still a compromise between geomorphological and a geo-stratigraphic mapping, but remain essential in planetary exploration programs, being crucial for science investigation, targeting observation strategies, safe landing and rovering, exploration of in situ resources, astronaut’s safety, planning of stable settlements, identification of sites of astrobiological interest.
The large and heterogeneous data-sets recently collected by planetary missions can now enable the embedding of traditional morphostratigraphic mapping with spectral units, three-dimensional geologic modelling as well as the use of virtual environment for detailed field analysis. Besides the geological mapping on remotely sensed data is the detailed mapping of analogue field sites which can be essential for a better geological interpretation of planetary data at different scales. 
To be prepared for the exponential increase of planetary missions in the years to come is needed an International collaborative efforts for geologic mapping and 3D geological reconstructions that can be tied to the USGS heritage and the new Europlanet infrastructure.

The session welcomes inputs on scientific mapping use cases on planetary surfaces and earth analogues, mapping-focused data fusion and integration, as well as tools and workflows for planetary geologic mapping, 3D geo-modelling and VR activities.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41601 

Conveners: Valentina Galluzzi, Matteo Massironi, Andrea Nass, Monica Pondrelli, Claudia Pöhler, David Williams

Abstract submission

MITM6 – (Exo-)planetary magnetospheres

The emphasis of the session is on all aspects of plasma physics and interactions of solar and stellar wind interactions with planets and exoplanets, including: (a) magnetospheric dynamics, aurorae, and radio emissions (b) potential impact of star-(exo-)planet coupling on habitability, (c) comparative studies between Solar System planets and exoplanets. We welcome contributions relying on space-based or ground-based observations as well as theoretical modelling and simulations.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41604 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Corentin Louis | Co-convener: Nicolas André

Abstract submission

MITM7 – Developments in the detection and characterization of planetary atmospheres

The study of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres involves a wide range of techniques and disciplines which provide crucial information about their vertical layering, their dynamics and chemistry, the role of condensable species in their meteorology. It is also a key contribution to the understanding of planet and moon climates and of their potential as habitable worlds, particularly in the case of exoplanets. The techniques involved in such investigations include, among other, ground-based telescopic observations, computer simulations and numerical models, and direct spacecraft observations (orbiters, landers, entry probes). 
We welcome presentations reviewing the current state-of-the-art techniques for the observation and investigation of (exo-)planetary atmospheres (composition, chemistry, dynamics), discussing the technical challenges and recent developments, and the implications for the potential habitability of exoplanet candidates.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41605 

Co-organized by TP/OPS/EXO

Convener: Michel Blanc | Co-conveners: Manuel Scherf, Thomas Smith

Abstract submission

MITM8 – Machine Learning in Planetary Sciences

Due to an increasing amount of data from a continuously increasing number of spacecraft in our solar system, new frameworks for rapidly and intelligently extracting information from these data sets are needed. Machine learning provides such a framework for tackling a wide range of research questions in planetary sciences. 
Machine learning approaches could improve existing models, creating computationally efficient algorithms for feature classification and regression problems, e.g. solar wind time series data, planetary surface images or hyperspectral data.

We encourage submissions dealing with machine learning approaches of all levels in planetary sciences. In this session, we aim to provide an overview of the current efforts to integrate machine learning technologies into data driven space research and to highlight state-of-the art developments.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41613 

Conveners: Ute Amerstorfer, Mario D’Amore, Sahib Julka, Angelo Pio Rossi, Hannah Ruedisser

Abstract submission

MITM9 – Upcoming and Future Planetary Missions, Instrumentations, and mission concepts

Together with the recent mission selections, a good number of ESA, JAXA, ISRO .. planetary missions and flight instruments are either in development or have been proposed and in review. Mission or instrument leads and/or team members are encouraged to present their missions or instruments for wider community awareness, lessons learned or for fostering future collaborations. Abstracts on concept planetary missions and instruments can also be considered for this session

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41614 

Conveners: Sebastien Besse, Colin Wilson

Abstract submission

TP7 – Cruise and planetary flybys investigations through space missions

In the latest years, many spacecraft missions operating in the Solar System are collecting data from the many regions of the heliosphere, sensibly increasing the scientific return of each mission, and providing additional opportunities for synergistic data acquisitions from environments and conditions that are different from each mission’s original baseline science operation plan. 
In addition, coordinated observations among different spacecraft is allowing to perform valuable investigations of the heliosphere from different point of view at the same time; thereby addressing many aspects of plasma processes related to the Sun, as well as the interactions of the solar wind and radiation with the planetary environments.
A bright example is the Venus atmosphere and magnetosphere investigations recently performed by BepiColombo, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter during their flybys around the planet, as well as their coordination with Akatsuki spacecraft orbiting around Venus itself, and with other spacecraft during their cruise measurements and with space and Earth-based telescope observations made jointly.
In this session, we welcome contributions to any kind of planetary and Solar System investigations made by space missions during their cruise and flybys operations. They may include the present flybys to Earth and Venus by BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe, but also future flybys investigations that will be made by future missions (i.e. JUICE); lessons learnt from past flybys to other planets such as the Rosetta flyby to Mars, the Earth and Venus flybys from Cassini or the legacy of the flybys to the Giant planets made by the Voyager missions.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41619 

Co-organized by OPS/MITM

Convener: Valeria Mangano | Co-conveners: Lina Hadid, Kandis Lea Jessup, Yeon Joo Lee, Beatriz Sanchez-Cano, Yannis Zouganelis

Abstract submission

TP19 – Open Lunar Science & Innovation

The EPSC symposium “Open Lunar Science & Innovation” will address:
– Celebrating the legacy of Apollo and Luna programmes after 50 years
– Recent lunar results: geochemistry, geophysics in the context of open planetary science and exploration
– Synthesis of results from Clementine, Prospector, SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang’e 1, 2 and 3, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LADEE, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Artemis and GRAIL
– First results from Chang’E 4, Chandrayaan2,
– Goals and Status of missions under preparation: orbiters, Luna25-27, SLIM, , Commercial landers, Chang’E 5 and Lunar sample return missions, Future cargo landers,
– Precursor missions, instruments and investigations for landers, rovers, sample return, and human cis-lunar activities and human lunar surface sorties (Artemis and others)
– Preparation for International Lunar Decade: databases, instruments, missions, terrestrial field campaigns, support studies
– ILEWG and Global Exploration roadmaps towards a global robotic/human Moon village
– Strategic Knowledge Gaps, and key science Goals relevant to Lunar Global Exploration
– The Moon Village with the goal of a sustainable human and robotic presence on the lunar surface as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities.
– The Moon for planetary science, life sciences, astronomy, fundamental research, resources utilisation, human spaceflight, peaceful cooperation, economical development, inspiration, training and capacity building.
– How a laboratory on the Moon should be equipped to be useful for a variety of disciplines, including geology, biology, and chemistry
– How can the Moon Village serve as a stepping stone for exploration of Mars and planetary bodies even further away?
– Historical, societal, humanistic aspects of lunar exploration

Lunar science and exploration are developing further with new and exciting missions being developed by China, the US, Japan, India, Russia, Korea and Europe, and with new stakeholders.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41617 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Bernard Foing

Abstract submission

TP16 – Mars Science and Exploration

Mars research community has seen an exceptional growth this year, with the unprecedented presence of 11 missions observing the planet simultaneously.

The aim of this session is to share the knowledge and experience between all Mars missions in operations and development, including the 3 new missions arrived this year, and promote multi-mission and multi-disciplinary synergies between the various exploration programmes in Europe and worldwide.

We welcome contributions from any field of Mars science and exploration, in particular latest scientific results and instrument overviews for all operational orbiters (Mars Express, ExoMars TGO, Odyssey, MRO, MAVEN, Mangalyaan/MOM, Tianwen-1, Hope) and surface assets (MSL, Insight, Mars2020, Tianwen-1), including operational and technical developments in preparation for the new missions (ExoMars RSP, MMX, and Mars Sample Return).

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41630 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Alejandro Cardesin-Moinelo | Co-conveners: Gerhard Kminek, Patrick Martin, Claire Newman, Elliot Sefton-Nash, Håkan Svedhem,Dmitrij Titov, Jorge Vago

Abstract submission

TP6 – Earth – a laboratory to prepare space exploration

Study of terrestrial analogue extreme environments is essential to prepare space researchers and coming missions, including (field) testing and improving technologies and prototype instrumentation, and space mission concepts. In addition it provides critical information to train astronauts for surface extra-vehicular activity, to develop science-driven robotic and human exploration missions. Planetary exploration and research in astrobiology have to rely on experiments and detection strategies that can be tested and proved on Earth. 

We welcome abstracts on different surface planetary processes, geochemical and astrobiological investigations using field analogues and laboratory simulation studies, field methods and sampling techniques. We also encourage abstracts focused on studies testing robotic missions and research regarding training crewed exploration missions and strategies, and testing exploration technology applications. Furthermore, we welcome abstracts outlining the use of the analogue field sites in engaging the public, as well as space agencies, the media, and educators. Terrestrial analogues are absolutely essential during all steps of a planetary mission, from the planning and definition phase, to the development of the space hardware and instrumentation, in situ operations and for understanding the limits of potential extraterrestrial microbial habitability and testing the reliability of biosignatures in the sedimentary record. Terrestrial analogues are also useful for training educators and developing public outreach activities.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41634 

Co-organized by MITM

Conveners: Barbara Cavalazzi, Fulvio Franchi | Co-conveners: Fernando Gomez, Felipe Gómez, Viggó Þór Marteinsson, Jonathan Merrison,Keld R. Rasmussen

Abstract submission

EXO7 – Future instruments to detect and characterise extrasolar planets and their environment

Exoplanets are being discovered in large numbers thanks to recent and ongoing surveys using state-of-the-art instrumentation from the ground and from space. In the next years, new astronomical instruments will further scout our Galaxy to overcome the current observational biases in the search of alien worlds, to gain a deeper understanding of the chemical and physical properties of both exoplanets and their environments, and to unveil the processes of formation and evolution of planets and their atmospheres.

The goal of this session is to bring together the instrumentation and observational communities that are underpinning the future of this field. Contributions are invited to review ongoing programmes of exoplanet and circumstellar discs discovery and characterisation, to update on the progress of planned instrumentation programmes, and to present innovative ideas for future instrumentation.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41610 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Camilla Danielski | Co-conveners: Elodie Choquet, Paul Eccleston, Enzo Pascale, Subhajit Sarkar

Abstract submission

EXO5 – Synergies between techniques for characterising exoplanets from space and ground-based facilities

The characterisation of exoplanets is among the most active and rapidly advancing fields in modern astrophysics. An increasing number of observing techniques have enabled the characterisation of exoplanet system properties and provided access to the planetary atmospheres (chemical composition, thermal state and dynamics). Recently, combined analyses using different types of observations have outperformed the standard approaches, e.g. enabling precise constraints on the chemical abundances and elemental ratios in their atmospheres, or measurements of both the star and planet spin-orbit angles.

The goal of this session is to inspire the cooperation between specialised teams to overcome the limits of the fragmented data analyses and to break degeneracies in their interpretation. Contributions are invited to present new methods and/or analyses that combine different kind of observations for comprehensive exoplanet characterisation.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41611 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Giuseppe Morello | Co-conveners: Camilla Danielski, Pierre-Olivier Lagage, Lisa Nortmann, Enric Palle, Fei Yan

Abstract submission

SB7 – Future missions and instruments for small bodies exploration

The space exploration of small Solar System bodies has provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of Solar System formation and evolution. Now that the Rosetta comet rendezvous and landing has passed and the Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-ReX sample return missions have finished their operations at the target asteroids, it is time to prepare future space mission for small bodies exploration. This session calls for presentations of the upcoming missions by ESA (Hera, Comet Interceptor), NASA (DART, Lucy, Psyche), JAXA (DESTINY+, MMX), and CNSA (name to be determined). 
Contribution about mission and instrument concepts for the more distant future are invited as well.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41661 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Michael Küppers | Co-conveners: Tomoko Arai, Andy Cheng, Gianrico Filacchione, Harold Levison, Jean-Baptiste Vincent,Xiaojing Zhang

Abstract submission

OPS2 – Icy worlds: Past and future explorations

The exploration of the outer solar system by Galileo at Jupiter, Cassini-Huygens at Saturn, New Horizons at Pluto-Charon and Dawn at Ceres, has revealed that several icy worlds harbor subsurface salty liquid reservoirs underneath their cold surface. By flying through the icy-vapor plume erupting from Enceladus’ south pole, Cassini proceeded for the first time to the analysis of fresh materials coming from an extraterrestrial ocean, revealing its astrobiological potentials. Even if there is no direct evidence yet, similar oceanic habitats might also be present within Europa, Ganymede, Titan and Triton, which will be characterized by future missions currently under development (JUICE, Europa Clipper, Dragonfly), or under study (Europa Lander, Trident, Enceladus orbiter/lander mission). Understanding these icy ocean worlds and their connections with smaller icy moons and rings requires input from a variety of scientific disciplines: planetary geology and geophysics, atmospheric physics, life sciences, space weathering, as well as supporting laboratory studies, numerical simulations, preparatory studies for future missions and technology developments in instrumentation and engineering. We welcome abstracts that span this full breadth of disciplines required for the characterization and future exploration of icy world systems.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41677 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Gabriel Tobie | Co-conveners: Carly Howett, Alice Lucchetti, Frank Postberg, Federico Tosi

Abstract submission

OPS3 – Ice Giant System Science and Exploration

This session will cover all aspects of ice giant (IG) systems including (but not limited to) the atmospheric structure and composition, magnetospheres, interiors, satellites, and rings of the IGs. Interdisciplinary, crosscutting themes of ice giant planet exploration, such as the relationship to exoplanetary science and connections to heliophysics are also included in the session. The session will comprise a combination of solicited and contributed oral and poster presentations on new, continuing, and future studies of the ice giant systems and the importance of the ice giants to models of the formation and evolution of the giant planets and solar systems. We welcome abstracts that 
• Address the current understanding of ice giant systems, including atmospheres, interiors, magnetospheres, rings, and satellites including Triton.
• Advance our understanding of the ice giant systems in preparation for future exploration, both by remote sensing and in situ.
• Discuss what the ice giants can tell us about solar system formation and evolution leading to a better understanding of the current structure of the solar system and its habitable zone as well as extrasolar systems.
• Address outstanding science questions requiring future investigations including from spacecraft, remote sensing, theoretical, and laboratory work necessary to improve our knowledge of the ice giants and their relationship to the gas giants and the solar system.
• Present concepts of missions, instruments and investigations relevant to future exploration of the ice giant planetary systems.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41678 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: David H. Atkinson | Co-conveners: Sushil K. Atreya, Thibault Cavalié, Leigh Fletcher, Mark Hofstadter, Jean-Pierre Lebreton,Kathleen Mandt, Olivier Mousis, Alena Probst

Abstract submission

OPS6 – Environments of outer planet moons: particles and fields

This session focuses on the environments of outer planet moons: their atmospheres, ionospheres, plumes, aurora, magnetic fields, magnetospheric environments and moon-magnetosphere interactions. Abstracts on all outer planet moons are welcome, including the moons of Saturn and Jupiter (e.g. Enceladus, Titan, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) and the less explored moons of Uranus and Neptune (e.g. Oberon and Triton).
Suggested topics include but are not limited to: atmospheric/ionospheric structures and compositions, plume detections and simulations, surface charging, auroral radio emissions, moon-magnetosphere interaction (e.g. wave-particle processes, particle acceleration, MHD turbulence), variability in the field and particle environments of the moons, opportunities and limitations of future JUICE and Europa Clipper measurements.
We welcome abstracts addressing the environments of outer planet moons from all disciplines, including in-situ and remote sensing data analysis, modeling and simulation results, ground-based observations and Earth-orbit-based observations. Relevant abstracts include results from past and current missions, such as Voyager, Galileo, Cassini-Huygens, Hisaki, and Juno, and studies in preparation for future missions such as JUICE and Europa Clipper.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41683 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Mika Holmberg | Co-conveners: Aljona Blöcker, Hans Huybrighs, Ronan Modolo, Oleg Shebanits, Ali Sulaiman

Abstract submission

Get creative with Europlanet’s #InspiredByOtherWorlds arts contest 2021

Get creative with Europlanet’s #InspiredByOtherWorlds arts contest 2021

The Europlanet Society Congress 2021 (#EPSC2021) is inviting schools and space enthusiasts of all ages to get creative and share their artworks and performances inspired by other worlds in a contest called #InspiredByOtherWorlds.

The theme this year is “Ingenuity”. Perhaps you are inspired by the Mars helicopter itself, the ingenuity of researchers or engineers that explore other planets, or the ingeniuty of other artists’ creative visions of other worlds. Perhaps you have ingenious ways of revealing planets, moons, asteroids, comets, meteorites, exoplanets through your art.

Art is meant to inspire. Art is meant to be shared. Art allows us to go beyond our limits. Planetary science takes us beyond the limits of our world. What happens when a passion for art and a passion for exploring planets and other worlds meet? Let your imagination take us on a voyage through our Solar System and planets around distant stars! Show us how you have been inspired to create drawings, storytelling, pictures, videos, models, craft works or art installations at home. 

#InspiredByOtherWorlds entries will be showcased in a virtual exhibition and highlighted during a dedicated session during EPSC2021, which is being held as a virtual meeting from 13-24 September 2021. 

All artworks submitted will be considered by a panel of planetary scientists and artists. Categories will include youth (under 18), adult, school class submissions, and multimedia. The winning artworks or performances will be shared via the Europlanet website, newsletters and social media and will be used to inspire young people in future Europlanet outreach activities.

So get creating! 

Rules

For all the information about the contest and how to prepare your submission, see the #InspiredByOtherWorlds FAQ page.

  • If you’d also like to share on social media please use the hashtags #InspiredByOtherWorlds #EPSC2021.
  •  The deadline is 6 September 2021.

Submit your artwork now!

If you have any questions, please contact stavro.ivanovski@inaf.it

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of OPS (Outer Planet Systems) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of OPS (Outer Planet Systems) sessions

OPS1 | OPS2 | OPS3 | OPS4 | OPS5 | OPS6 | SB9 | SP10 | MITM7 | TP1 | TP4 | TP5 | TP7 | TP8 |

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 Outer Planets Systems (OPS) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, submit contributions and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

OPS1 – “Planet” Titan

Saturn’s moon Titan, despite its satellite status, has nothing to envy to planets: it has planetary dimensions, a substantial and dynamic atmosphere, a carbon cycle, a variety of geological features (dunes, lakes, rivers, mountains and more), seasons, and a hidden ocean. It even now has its own mission: Dragonfly, selected by NASA in the frame of the New Frontiers program.
In this session, scientific presentations are solicited to cover all aspects of current research on Titan: from its interior to its upper atmosphere, using data collected from the Cassini-Huygens mission (2004-2017) and/or from ground-based telescopes (e.g., ALMA) and/or based on modelling and experimental efforts to support the interpretation of past and future observations of this unique world.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41676 

Convener: Anezina Solomonidou | Co-conveners: Sam Birch, Alice Le Gall, Shannon M. MacKenzie, Marco Mastrogiuseppe

Abstract submission

OPS2 – Icy worlds: Past and future explorations

The exploration of the outer solar system by Galileo at Jupiter, Cassini-Huygens at Saturn, New Horizons at Pluto-Charon and Dawn at Ceres, has revealed that several icy worlds harbor subsurface salty liquid reservoirs underneath their cold surface. By flying through the icy-vapor plume erupting from Enceladus’ south pole, Cassini proceeded for the first time to the analysis of fresh materials coming from an extraterrestrial ocean, revealing its astrobiological potentials. Even if there is no direct evidence yet, similar oceanic habitats might also be present within Europa, Ganymede, Titan and Triton, which will be characterized by future missions currently under development (JUICE, Europa Clipper, Dragonfly), or under study (Europa Lander, Trident, Enceladus orbiter/lander mission). Understanding these icy ocean worlds and their connections with smaller icy moons and rings requires input from a variety of scientific disciplines: planetary geology and geophysics, atmospheric physics, life sciences, space weathering, as well as supporting laboratory studies, numerical simulations, preparatory studies for future missions and technology developments in instrumentation and engineering. We welcome abstracts that span this full breadth of disciplines required for the characterization and future exploration of icy world systems.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41677 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Gabriel Tobie | Co-conveners: Carly Howett, Alice Lucchetti, Frank Postberg, Federico Tosi

Abstract submission

OPS3 – Ice Giant System Science and Exploration

This session will cover all aspects of ice giant (IG) systems including (but not limited to) the atmospheric structure and composition, magnetospheres, interiors, satellites, and rings of the IGs. Interdisciplinary, crosscutting themes of ice giant planet exploration, such as the relationship to exoplanetary science and connections to heliophysics are also included in the session. The session will comprise a combination of solicited and contributed oral and poster presentations on new, continuing, and future studies of the ice giant systems and the importance of the ice giants to models of the formation and evolution of the giant planets and solar systems. We welcome abstracts that 
• Address the current understanding of ice giant systems, including atmospheres, interiors, magnetospheres, rings, and satellites including Triton.
• Advance our understanding of the ice giant systems in preparation for future exploration, both by remote sensing and in situ.
• Discuss what the ice giants can tell us about solar system formation and evolution leading to a better understanding of the current structure of the solar system and its habitable zone as well as extrasolar systems.
• Address outstanding science questions requiring future investigations including from spacecraft, remote sensing, theoretical, and laboratory work necessary to improve our knowledge of the ice giants and their relationship to the gas giants and the solar system.
• Present concepts of missions, instruments and investigations relevant to future exploration of the ice giant planetary systems.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41678 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: David H. Atkinson | Co-conveners: Sushil K. Atreya, Thibault Cavalié, Leigh Fletcher, Mark Hofstadter, Jean-Pierre Lebreton,Kathleen Mandt, Olivier Mousis, Alena Probst

Abstract submission

OPS4 – A new view of Jupiter, Saturn, and giant planets from the polar-orbiting Juno and Cassini spacecraft

The Juno mission is providing crucial new data sets addressing Jupiter’s interior, atmosphere and magnetosphere that challenge current theories of formation, evolution and dynamics of both Jupiter and giant planets in general. The Juno results when combined with data sets from previous missions such as Cassini, Galileo, and Voyager as well as exoplanet observations and models, is providing a new opportunity for the study of comparative planetology. This session welcomes contributions on a wide variety of topics regarding Jupiter, Saturn and giant planets in general: gravity and magnetic field analysis and interpretation, giant planet magnetospheres, aurorae, radiation environments, atmospheric dynamics, planet interiors and satellite interactions. The session also welcomes remote observations acquired in support of Juno and Cassini, and discussions of formation scenarios and evolutionary pathways of planetary bodies in our Solar System and beyond.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41679 

Convener: Yasmina M Martos | Co-conveners: Arrate Antunano, Scott Bolton, Bertrand Bonfond, George Clark, Stavros Kotsiaros,Yamila Miguel

Abstract submission

OPS5 – Aerosols and clouds in planetary atmospheres

Atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles are found in every atmosphere of the solar system, as well as, in exoplanets. Depending on their size, shape, chemical composition, latent heat, and distribution, their effect on the radiation budget varies drastically and is difficult to predict. When organic, aerosols also carry a strong prebiotic interest reinforced by the presence of heavy atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur.

The aim of the session is to gather presentations on these complex objects for both terrestrial and giant planet atmospheres, including the special cases of Titan’s and Pluto’s hazy atmospheres. All research aspects from their production and evolution processes, their observation/detection, to their fate and atmospheric impact are welcomed, including laboratory investigations and modeling.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41680 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Panayotis Lavvas | Co-conveners: Nathalie Carrasco, Anni Määttänen

Abstract submission

OPS6 – Environments of outer planet moons: particles and fields

This session focuses on the environments of outer planet moons: their atmospheres, ionospheres, plumes, aurora, magnetic fields, magnetospheric environments and moon-magnetosphere interactions. Abstracts on all outer planet moons are welcome, including the moons of Saturn and Jupiter (e.g. Enceladus, Titan, Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto) and the less explored moons of Uranus and Neptune (e.g. Oberon and Triton).
Suggested topics include but are not limited to: atmospheric/ionospheric structures and compositions, plume detections and simulations, surface charging, auroral radio emissions, moon-magnetosphere interaction (e.g. wave-particle processes, particle acceleration, MHD turbulence), variability in the field and particle environments of the moons, opportunities and limitations of future JUICE and Europa Clipper measurements.
We welcome abstracts addressing the environments of outer planet moons from all disciplines, including in-situ and remote sensing data analysis, modeling and simulation results, ground-based observations and Earth-orbit-based observations. Relevant abstracts include results from past and current missions, such as Voyager, Galileo, Cassini-Huygens, Hisaki, and Juno, and studies in preparation for future missions such as JUICE and Europa Clipper.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41683 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Mika Holmberg | Co-conveners: Aljona Blöcker, Hans Huybrighs, Ronan Modolo, Oleg Shebanits, Ali Sulaiman

Abstract submission

SB10 – Planetary Rings – Protoplanetary Disks

Thanks to the advancement of observational techniques from Earth and space, our knowledge of planetary ring systems and protoplanetary disks has greatly improved. While these two classes of objects differ by orders of magnitude in dimension and evolutionary stage, they offer a unique opportunity to investigate common dynamical processes that can shed light on the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems. Although rings are common companions of the outer planets in our solar system, so far we do not yet have firm evidence of similar structures around exoplanets. In this respect, the characteristics of solar system rings can be used as a benchmark to tune ongoing exo-ring surveys. Conversely, high-angular resolution images obtained with new instruments such as the ALMA interferometer and SPHERE on VLT have revealed that protoplanetary discs are also characterized by substructures such
as gaps and narrow rings. The formation of these rings can be explained by the dynamical interaction of the gas and dust in the disc with one or more embedded planets. Similar processes are also common in planetary rings, as revealed by the unprecedented spatial
resolution of Cassini observations at Saturn. In this session we invite abstracts related to both theoretical and observational studies of
planetary rings and protoplanetary disks, as well as exo-ring research.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41672 

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Convener: Philip D. Nicholson | Co-conveners: Gianrico Filacchione, Linda Podio, Claudia Toci

Abstract submission

TP5 – Astrobiology

Astrobiology is the study of whether present or past life exists elsewhere in the universe. To understand how life can begin in space, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. This session seeks papers that offer existing/novel theoretical models or computational works that address the chemical and environmental conditions relevant to astrobiology on terrestrial planets/moons or ocean worlds, along with other theoretical, experimental, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in the Universe. This includes work related to prebiotic chemistry, the chemistry of early life, the biogeochemistry of life’s interaction with its environment, chemistry associated with biosignatures and their false positives, and chemistry pertinent to conditions that could possibly harbor life (e.g. Titan, Enceladus, Europa, TRAPPIST-1, habitable exoplanets, etc.). Understanding how the planetary environment has influenced the evolution of life and how biological processes have changed the environment is an essential part of any study of the origin and search for signs of life. Earth analogues experiments/instruments test and/or simulation campaigns and limits of life studies are included as well as one of the main topics of this session. Major Space Agencies identified planetary habitability and the search for evidence of life as a key component of their scientific missions in the next two decades. The development of instrumentation and technology to support the search for complex organic molecules/sings of life/biosignatures and the endurance of life in space environments is critical to define unambiguous approaches to life detection over a broad range of planetary environments.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41616 

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Convener: Felipe Gómez | Co-convener: Pamela Conrad

Abstract submission

MITM7 – Developments in the detection and characterization of planetary atmospheres

The study of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres involves a wide range of techniques and disciplines which provide crucial information about their vertical layering, their dynamics and chemistry, the role of condensable species in their meteorology. It is also a key contribution to the understanding of planet and moon climates and of their potential as habitable worlds, particularly in the case of exoplanets. The techniques involved in such investigations include, among other, ground-based telescopic observations, computer simulations and numerical models, and direct spacecraft observations (orbiters, landers, entry probes). 
We welcome presentations reviewing the current state-of-the-art techniques for the observation and investigation of (exo-)planetary atmospheres (composition, chemistry, dynamics), discussing the technical challenges and recent developments, and the implications for the potential habitability of exoplanet candidates.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41605 

Co-organized by TP/OPS/EXO

Convener: Michel Blanc | Co-conveners: Manuel Scherf, Thomas Smith

Abstract submission

SB9 – Computational and experimental astrophysics of small bodies and planets

The goal of this session is to cover numerical simulations and relevant laboratory investigations related to the Small Bodies (comets, KBOs, rings, asteroids, meteorites, dust), their formation and evolution, and the instruments of their exploration. This session is specially focused on the interdisciplinary approach in the development of models (formal descriptions of physical phenomena), experiments (on ground and in micro-gravity), and mathematical simulations (computational methods and algorithms of solution) of various astrophysical phenomena: (i) dusty gas cometary atmospheres; (ii) volcanic activity on icy satellites (e.g. Enceladus and Io); (iii) planetary body formation (e.g. via pebbles growth), and planetesimal dynamics.

This session will include an introduction and discussion of new and/or existing laboratory studies in simulated space-like environments and models, experimental techniques, computational methods that can address the results of analytical, experimental and numerical analysis (with respect to computational methods and algorithms of solution) on the above described studies.

Abstracts on thermophysical evolution models of small bodies interiors as well as on the modeling of atmosphere and exosphere are welcome.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41671 

Co-organized by OPS

Convener: Vladimir Zakharov | Co-conveners: Vincenzo Della Corte, Marco Fulle, Stavro Lambrov Ivanovski, Raphael Marschall,Alessandra Rotundi, Diego Turrini

Abstract submission

TP4 – Impact Processes in the Solar System

mpact processes shaped the Solar System, and modify planetary surfaces and small bodies until today. Impacts also have a technical application for Planetary Defence, exemplified by the joint ESA/NASA Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) collaboration. This session aims at understanding impact processes at all scales in terms of shock metamorphism, dynamical aspects, geochemical consequences, environmental effects and biotic response, and cratering chronology. Naturally, advancing our understanding of impact phenomena requires a multidisciplinary approach, which includes (but it is not limited to) observations of craters, strewn field or airbursts, numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, geologic and structural mapping, remote sensing, as well as petrographic and geochemical analysis of impact products.

We welcome presentations across this broad range of studies about natural or artificial impact collision phenomena on planetary and small bodies. In particular, we encourage work that bridges the gap between the investigative methods employed in studying planetary impact processes at all scales.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41622 

Co-organized by OPS/SB

Convener: Elena Martellato | Co-conveners: Chrysa Avdellidou, Christopher Hamann, Isabel Herreros, Robert Luther, Jens Ormö

Abstract submission

TP8 – Planetary space weather and space weathering on airless bodies

The surfaces of air-less celestial bodies are directly exposed to the environmental radiation, ions, and micrometeoroids. The result of these interactions is an alteration of the surface structure and chemical composition, generally referred to as space weathering. At the same time, these interactions release surface material that refills the surface-bounded exosphere and, directly or indirectly, is a source of planetary ions in the environment. The study of the planetary response to variable external conditions is the broad meaning of planetary space weather.
Over the next decade, the BepiColombo mission to Mercury and JUICE mission to Jupiter’s system, together with the Moon space exploration program, will offer unprecedented opportunities to investigate the interaction processes at airless bodies. 
In the present session, we welcome observation-driven, theoretical, and experimental studies 
• on all the air-less bodies interacting with solar wind (like Mercury, Moon and asteroids) or with magnetospheric ions (outer planets icy moons); 
• on micrometeoroid gardening and impact vaporization effects onto the surface and onto the exosphere;
• on the effects of other agents like photons, electrons, and high-energy particles;
• on laboratory experiments for investigating surface release processes and surface modifications.
• on spectral measurements of various planetary analogous undergone space weathering processes.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41621 

Co-organized by OPS

Convener: Anna Milillo | Co-conveners: André Galli, Indhu Varatharajan

Abstract submission

TP7 – Cruise and planetary flybys investigations through space missions

In the latest years, many spacecraft missions operating in the Solar System are collecting data from the many regions of the heliosphere, sensibly increasing the scientific return of each mission, and providing additional opportunities for synergistic data acquisitions from environments and conditions that are different from each mission’s original baseline science operation plan. 
In addition, coordinated observations among different spacecraft is allowing to perform valuable investigations of the heliosphere from different point of view at the same time; thereby addressing many aspects of plasma processes related to the Sun, as well as the interactions of the solar wind and radiation with the planetary environments.
A bright example is the Venus atmosphere and magnetosphere investigations recently performed by BepiColombo, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter during their flybys around the planet, as well as their coordination with Akatsuki spacecraft orbiting around Venus itself, and with other spacecraft during their cruise measurements and with space and Earth-based telescope observations made jointly.
In this session, we welcome contributions to any kind of planetary and Solar System investigations made by space missions during their cruise and flybys operations. They may include the present flybys to Earth and Venus by BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe, but also future flybys investigations that will be made by future missions (i.e. JUICE); lessons learnt from past flybys to other planets such as the Rosetta flyby to Mars, the Earth and Venus flybys from Cassini or the legacy of the flybys to the Giant planets made by the Voyager missions.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41619 

Co-organized by OPS/MITM

Convener: Valeria Mangano | Co-conveners: Lina Hadid, Kandis Lea Jessup, Yeon Joo Lee, Beatriz Sanchez-Cano, Yannis Zouganelis

Abstract submission

TP1 – Planetary Dynamics: Shape, Gravity, Orbit, Tides, and Rotation from Observations and Models

Shape, gravity field, orbit, tidal deformation, and rotation state are fundamental geodetic parameters of any planetary object. Measurements of these parameters are prerequisites for e.g. spacecraft navigation and mapping from orbit, but also for modelling of the interior and evolution. This session welcomes contributions from all aspects of planetary geodesy, including the relevant theories, observations and models in application to planets, satellites, ring systems, asteroids, and comets.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41635 

Co-organized by OPS/SB

Convener: Alexander Stark | Co-conveners: Hannah Susorney, Daniel Wahl, Marie Yseboodt

Abstract submission

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of TP (Terrestrial Planets) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of TP (Terrestrial Planets) sessions

TP1 | TP3 | TP4 | TP5 | TP6 | TP7 | TP8 | TP10 | TP12 | TP14 | TP15 | TP16 | TP17 | TP18 | TP19 | TP20 | TP21

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 Terrestrial Planets (TP) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, submit contributions and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

TP1 – Planetary Dynamics: Shape, Gravity, Orbit, Tides, and Rotation from Observations and Models

Shape, gravity field, orbit, tidal deformation, and rotation state are fundamental geodetic parameters of any planetary object. Measurements of these parameters are prerequisites for e.g. spacecraft navigation and mapping from orbit, but also for modelling of the interior and evolution. This session welcomes contributions from all aspects of planetary geodesy, including the relevant theories, observations and models in application to planets, satellites, ring systems, asteroids, and comets.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41635 

Co-organized by OPS/SB

Convener: Alexander Stark | Co-conveners: Hannah Susorney, Daniel Wahl, Marie Yseboodt

Abstract submission

TP3 – Multi-disciplinary perspective on late accretion processes: from impact processes to early differentiation

Late accretion onto the terrestrial planets is of critical importance for understanding the early chemical differentiation processes and the evolution of the terrestrial planets in the solar system. This session aims at obtaining an integrated understanding of these processes from a multidisciplinary perspective. The session aims at bringing together geodynamics, (isotope) geo- and cosmochemistry, experimental petrology, and numerical modeling with a particular focus on the Earth, Moon and Mars.

We welcome contributions from any of these disciplines, especially contributions aimed at improving our current understanding of key processes involved in the early evolution of the terrestrial planets including the provenance and composition of late accreted bodies, the role of giant impacts in volatile loss processes and core formation, the formation and evolution of magma oceans, early convection processes in planetary mantles, and the cooling history of terrestrial planets.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41624 

Convener: Laetitia Allibert | Co-conveners: Gregor Golabek, Thomas Kruijer, Lena Noack, Sabrina Schwinger, Julien Siebert

Abstract submission

TP4 – Impact Processes in the Solar System

mpact processes shaped the Solar System, and modify planetary surfaces and small bodies until today. Impacts also have a technical application for Planetary Defence, exemplified by the joint ESA/NASA Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) collaboration. This session aims at understanding impact processes at all scales in terms of shock metamorphism, dynamical aspects, geochemical consequences, environmental effects and biotic response, and cratering chronology. Naturally, advancing our understanding of impact phenomena requires a multidisciplinary approach, which includes (but it is not limited to) observations of craters, strewn field or airbursts, numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, geologic and structural mapping, remote sensing, as well as petrographic and geochemical analysis of impact products.

We welcome presentations across this broad range of studies about natural or artificial impact collision phenomena on planetary and small bodies. In particular, we encourage work that bridges the gap between the investigative methods employed in studying planetary impact processes at all scales.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41622 

Co-organized by OPS/SB

Convener: Elena Martellato | Co-conveners: Chrysa Avdellidou, Christopher Hamann, Isabel Herreros, Robert Luther, Jens Ormö

Abstract submission

TP5 – Astrobiology

Astrobiology is the study of whether present or past life exists elsewhere in the universe. To understand how life can begin in space, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. This session seeks papers that offer existing/novel theoretical models or computational works that address the chemical and environmental conditions relevant to astrobiology on terrestrial planets/moons or ocean worlds, along with other theoretical, experimental, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in the Universe. This includes work related to prebiotic chemistry, the chemistry of early life, the biogeochemistry of life’s interaction with its environment, chemistry associated with biosignatures and their false positives, and chemistry pertinent to conditions that could possibly harbor life (e.g. Titan, Enceladus, Europa, TRAPPIST-1, habitable exoplanets, etc.). Understanding how the planetary environment has influenced the evolution of life and how biological processes have changed the environment is an essential part of any study of the origin and search for signs of life. Earth analogues experiments/instruments test and/or simulation campaigns and limits of life studies are included as well as one of the main topics of this session. Major Space Agencies identified planetary habitability and the search for evidence of life as a key component of their scientific missions in the next two decades. The development of instrumentation and technology to support the search for complex organic molecules/sings of life/biosignatures and the endurance of life in space environments is critical to define unambiguous approaches to life detection over a broad range of planetary environments.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41616 

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Convener: Felipe Gómez | Co-convener: Pamela Conrad

Abstract submission

TP6 – Earth – a laboratory to prepare space exploration

Study of terrestrial analogue extreme environments is essential to prepare space researchers and coming missions, including (field) testing and improving technologies and prototype instrumentation, and space mission concepts. In addition it provides critical information to train astronauts for surface extra-vehicular activity, to develop science-driven robotic and human exploration missions. Planetary exploration and research in astrobiology have to rely on experiments and detection strategies that can be tested and proved on Earth. 

We welcome abstracts on different surface planetary processes, geochemical and astrobiological investigations using field analogues and laboratory simulation studies, field methods and sampling techniques. We also encourage abstracts focused on studies testing robotic missions and research regarding training crewed exploration missions and strategies, and testing exploration technology applications. Furthermore, we welcome abstracts outlining the use of the analogue field sites in engaging the public, as well as space agencies, the media, and educators. Terrestrial analogues are absolutely essential during all steps of a planetary mission, from the planning and definition phase, to the development of the space hardware and instrumentation, in situ operations and for understanding the limits of potential extraterrestrial microbial habitability and testing the reliability of biosignatures in the sedimentary record. Terrestrial analogues are also useful for training educators and developing public outreach activities.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41634 

Co-organized by MITM

Conveners: Barbara Cavalazzi, Fulvio Franchi | Co-conveners: Fernando Gomez, Felipe Gómez, Viggó Þór Marteinsson, Jonathan Merrison,Keld R. Rasmussen

Abstract submission

TP7 – Cruise and planetary flybys investigations through space missions

In the latest years, many spacecraft missions operating in the Solar System are collecting data from the many regions of the heliosphere, sensibly increasing the scientific return of each mission, and providing additional opportunities for synergistic data acquisitions from environments and conditions that are different from each mission’s original baseline science operation plan. 
In addition, coordinated observations among different spacecraft is allowing to perform valuable investigations of the heliosphere from different point of view at the same time; thereby addressing many aspects of plasma processes related to the Sun, as well as the interactions of the solar wind and radiation with the planetary environments.
A bright example is the Venus atmosphere and magnetosphere investigations recently performed by BepiColombo, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter during their flybys around the planet, as well as their coordination with Akatsuki spacecraft orbiting around Venus itself, and with other spacecraft during their cruise measurements and with space and Earth-based telescope observations made jointly.
In this session, we welcome contributions to any kind of planetary and Solar System investigations made by space missions during their cruise and flybys operations. They may include the present flybys to Earth and Venus by BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter and Parker Solar Probe, but also future flybys investigations that will be made by future missions (i.e. JUICE); lessons learnt from past flybys to other planets such as the Rosetta flyby to Mars, the Earth and Venus flybys from Cassini or the legacy of the flybys to the Giant planets made by the Voyager missions.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41619 

Co-organized by OPS/MITM

Convener: Valeria Mangano | Co-conveners: Lina Hadid, Kandis Lea Jessup, Yeon Joo Lee, Beatriz Sanchez-Cano, Yannis Zouganelis

Abstract submission

TP8 – Planetary space weather and space weathering on airless bodies

The surfaces of air-less celestial bodies are directly exposed to the environmental radiation, ions, and micrometeoroids. The result of these interactions is an alteration of the surface structure and chemical composition, generally referred to as space weathering. At the same time, these interactions release surface material that refills the surface-bounded exosphere and, directly or indirectly, is a source of planetary ions in the environment. The study of the planetary response to variable external conditions is the broad meaning of planetary space weather.
Over the next decade, the BepiColombo mission to Mercury and JUICE mission to Jupiter’s system, together with the Moon space exploration program, will offer unprecedented opportunities to investigate the interaction processes at airless bodies. 
In the present session, we welcome observation-driven, theoretical, and experimental studies 
• on all the air-less bodies interacting with solar wind (like Mercury, Moon and asteroids) or with magnetospheric ions (outer planets icy moons); 
• on micrometeoroid gardening and impact vaporization effects onto the surface and onto the exosphere;
• on the effects of other agents like photons, electrons, and high-energy particles;
• on laboratory experiments for investigating surface release processes and surface modifications.
• on spectral measurements of various planetary analogous undergone space weathering processes.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41621 

Co-organized by OPS

Convener: Anna Milillo | Co-conveners: André Galli, Indhu Varatharajan

Abstract submission

TP10 – Ionospheres of unmagnetized or weakly magnetized bodies

Ionospheres are a fundamental part of planetary and cometary atmospheres that are formed by solar radiation and are affected by a myriad of different processes, such as space weather activity or neutral atmosphere variations. Moreover, ionospheres play an important role in controlling the dynamics of the system, as they are the link between the neutral atmosphere, exosphere and surrounding plasma environments (e.g. the solar wind for Mars, Venus, Pluto and comets, and the Kronian magnetosphere for Titan). Understanding how each unmagnetized body reacts to all these factors is a key in comparative aeronomy because although a priori all of them have a general similar behaviour, they also have scientifically important differences caused by their different natures.

This session focuses on the ionospheres of Mars, Venus, Pluto, Titan, and comets, and solicits abstracts concerning remote and in situ data analysis, modelling studies, instrumentation and mission concepts. Topics may include, but are not limited to, day and night side ionospheric variability, sources and influences of ionization, ion-neutral coupling, current systems, comparative ionospheric studies, and solar wind-ionosphere interactions and responses of the ionized and neutral regimes to transient space weather events. Abstracts on general plasma and escape processes are also welcome.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41633 

Convener: Beatriz Sanchez-Cano | Co-conveners: Niklas Edberg, Xiaohua Fang, Christopher Fowler, Francisco González-Galindo, Yingjuan Ma

Abstract submission

TP12 – Atmospheres and Exospheres of Terrestrial Bodies

Space missions have provided a wealth of data on the atmospheres and aeronomy of rocky planets and moons, from the lower layers up to the external envelopes in direct contact with the solar wind. A recent emerging finding is evidence that the atmosphere behaves as a single coherent system with complex coupling between layers.

This session solicits contributions that investigate processes at work (chemistry, energetics, dynamics, electricity, escape etc…) on the terrestrial bodies of the Solar System and includes studies of the coupling between the lower/middle and upper atmospheres. Contributions based on analysis of recent spacecraft and ground-based
observations, comparative planetology studies, numerical modelling and relevant laboratory investigations are particularly welcome. The session will consist of invited and contributed oral talks as well as posters.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41623 

Convener: Anni Määttänen | Co-conveners: Francisco González-Galindo, Dmitrij Titov

Abstract submission

TP14 – Mercury Science and Observations

Understanding the formation, evolution, composition, the interior structure and the environment of Mercury is a primary goal of the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission and of many theoretical, observational, and experimental studies. NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft provided many new insights and surprising results regarding these goals. However, the mission also raised many new questions that will be addressed by ESA/JAXA BepiColombo that has been successfully launched in October 2018. This session welcomes contributions addressing the planet’s geology, surface composition, geodesy, interior structure, laboratory measurements, ground-based observations, exosphere, magnetosphere, gravity and magnetic fields and all those work related to the investigation of this terrestrial planet.
A second focus lies on plans for new mission ideas to Mercury including Mercury landing modules.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41629 

Conveners: Johannes Benkhoff, Léa Griton | Co-conveners: Alice Lucchetti, Go Murakami, Joana S. Oliveira, Beatriz Sanchez-Cano,Joe Zender

Abstract submission

TP15 – Venus Science and Exploration

The session welcomes presentations on all aspects of the Venus system including interior, surface, atmosphere and ionosphere. We welcome presentations based on past or current observations, theory and modelling, as well as presentations related to future instrumentation, orbiter & in-situ mission concepts.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41590 

Convener: Thomas Widemann | Co-conveners: Richard Ghail, Dmitry Gorinov, Anna Gülcher, Yeon Joo Lee, Moa Persson, Colin Wilson

Abstract submission

TP16 – Mars Science and Exploration

Mars research community has seen an exceptional growth this year, with the unprecedented presence of 11 missions observing the planet simultaneously.

The aim of this session is to share the knowledge and experience between all Mars missions in operations and development, including the 3 new missions arrived this year, and promote multi-mission and multi-disciplinary synergies between the various exploration programmes in Europe and worldwide.

We welcome contributions from any field of Mars science and exploration, in particular latest scientific results and instrument overviews for all operational orbiters (Mars Express, ExoMars TGO, Odyssey, MRO, MAVEN, Mangalyaan/MOM, Tianwen-1, Hope) and surface assets (MSL, Insight, Mars2020, Tianwen-1), including operational and technical developments in preparation for the new missions (ExoMars RSP, MMX, and Mars Sample Return).

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41630 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Alejandro Cardesin-Moinelo | Co-conveners: Gerhard Kminek, Patrick Martin, Claire Newman, Elliot Sefton-Nash, Håkan Svedhem,Dmitrij Titov, Jorge Vago

Abstract submission

TP17 – Mars Surface and Interior

This session welcomes all presentations on Mars’ interior and surface processes. With three new missions arrived in early 2021 (Mars2020, Hope, Tianwen-1), Mars research is as active as ever, and new data come in on a daily basis. The aim of this session is to bring together disciplines as various as geology, geomorphology, geophysics, mineralogy, glaciology, and chemistry. We welcome presentations on either present or past Mars processes, either pure Mars science or comparative planetology, either observations or modeling or laboratory experiments (or any combination of those). New results on Mars science obtained from recent in situ and orbital measurements are particularly encouraged, as well as studies related to upcoming missions and campaigns (ExoMars, Mars Sample Return).

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41589 

Convener: Ernst Hauber | Co-conveners: Solmaz Adeli, Maurizio Pajola, Ana-Catalina Plesa

Abstract submission

TP18 – Fluid Circulation, Fluid-Rock Interactions, and Cryosphere on Mars

This session welcomes presentations about aqueous/ice migrations and fluid flows on the surface and subsurface of Mars. Fluid flows are central in fields such as volcano-tectonic, diagenesis, deep-biosphere and water/ice cycles. Accordingly, participants are encouraged to apply for this session with contributions concerning: 1) fluid migration mechanisms, products and effects (e.g. fluvial lacustrine environments, mud volcanism, hydrothermalism) and 2) volatile evolution from erosion to deposition and diagenesis. Experimental and numerical modeling of fluid circulation processes and water-rock interaction are also welcome.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41618 

Conveners: Barbara De Toffoli, Riccardo Pozzobon | Co-convener: Susanne P Schwenzer

Abstract submission

TP19 – Open Lunar Science & Innovation

The EPSC symposium “Open Lunar Science & Innovation” will address:
– Celebrating the legacy of Apollo and Luna programmes after 50 years
– Recent lunar results: geochemistry, geophysics in the context of open planetary science and exploration
– Synthesis of results from Clementine, Prospector, SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang’e 1, 2 and 3, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LADEE, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Artemis and GRAIL
– First results from Chang’E 4, Chandrayaan2,
– Goals and Status of missions under preparation: orbiters, Luna25-27, SLIM, , Commercial landers, Chang’E 5 and Lunar sample return missions, Future cargo landers,
– Precursor missions, instruments and investigations for landers, rovers, sample return, and human cis-lunar activities and human lunar surface sorties (Artemis and others)
– Preparation for International Lunar Decade: databases, instruments, missions, terrestrial field campaigns, support studies
– ILEWG and Global Exploration roadmaps towards a global robotic/human Moon village
– Strategic Knowledge Gaps, and key science Goals relevant to Lunar Global Exploration
– The Moon Village with the goal of a sustainable human and robotic presence on the lunar surface as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities.
– The Moon for planetary science, life sciences, astronomy, fundamental research, resources utilisation, human spaceflight, peaceful cooperation, economical development, inspiration, training and capacity building.
– How a laboratory on the Moon should be equipped to be useful for a variety of disciplines, including geology, biology, and chemistry
– How can the Moon Village serve as a stepping stone for exploration of Mars and planetary bodies even further away?
– Historical, societal, humanistic aspects of lunar exploration

Lunar science and exploration are developing further with new and exciting missions being developed by China, the US, Japan, India, Russia, Korea and Europe, and with new stakeholders.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41617 

Co-organized by MITM

Convener: Bernard Foing

Abstract submission

TP20 – Lunar surface: samples, (mega)regolith, observations

A great wealth of knowledge of our Moon stems from sampling and observing its surface. This session aims to attract a variety of scientific contributions addressing lunar surface processes and (mega)regolith evolution in terms of geology, geochronology, geophysics, geodynamics, geochemistry, numerical modeling, and remote sensing.
New results on lunar science obtained from samples and orbital measurements are encouraged, as well as studies related to the latest and upcoming missions.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41620 

Convener: Tiantian Liu | Co-conveners: Philipp Gläser, Wajiha Iqbal, Thomas Kruijer, Stephanie C. Werner

Abstract submission

TP21 – The emergence of Life in our Solar System and Beyond

This session seeks papers on the biological, physicochemical, astrophysical, and paleontological studies of the living-matter origination problem, mechanism, conditions necessary and sufficient for living-matter origination and development on the Earth and other celestial objects; promising celestial objects for the living-matter occurrence, and other experimental, theoretical, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in our Solar System and beyond are welcomed.
This includes work related to theme of the Origins of Life to study interstellar chemistry, meteorites and comets chemistry as well as the chemistry of planets. A central issue in the research on the emergence of life is the paradoxical role of water in pre-biotic chemistry. Infact,on the one hand, water is essential for all known life, on the other hand it is highly destructive for key biomolecules such as nucleic and polypeptides.
A truly interdisciplinary approach is needed to delve into the core of the issue of emergence of life, because in addition to physics and chemistry it is also need to deploy a number of other sciences. We rely on contribution caming from mathematical or philosophical perspectives not only on astrobiology moreover we think that a part of the answers may lie in scientists who working on cancer research, genetics, space exploration paleontology who are not necessarily involved in this field. I argue that synthetic biology field, challenging most accepted definitions of life too, might also shed some novel and interesting perspectives on one of the most puzzling unanswered questions of science.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41767 

Co-organized by EXO

Convener: Rosanna del Gaudio | Co-conveners: Terence Kee, Frank Trixler

Abstract submission

EXO1 – Zooming In On Planet Formation

The inner regions of planet forming disks surrounding young stars are key to our understanding of the formation of rocky, Earth-like planets and super-Earths. We know from exoplanet surveys that such planets are abundantly present around low mass stars. Rocky planets are essential ingredients in the quest for life outside the solar system. Understanding their properties and formation history is key to our efforts to put the solar system in perspective.

Investigations of the outer regions of the accretion disk provide us with information on the distribution of volatile material and ices in planetary systems, and studies on disk properties, on evolved cold, gaseous or sub-Neptune planets, as well as migration studies of planets leading to various different system architectures (e.g. to hot Jupiters close to their host star) help us to better understand the evolution of our own solar system. 

We invite abstracts from different disciplines working on planet formation, including for example observations of planet forming disks, recent or on-going exoplanet surveys, theoretical and computational models, as well as comparative studies using solar system data from exploration missions, meteorite analysis and remote sensing.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41645 

Co-organized by TP

Convener: Lena Noack | Co-conveners: Myriam Benisty, Mario Flock, Inga Kamp, Yamila Miguel, Rens Waters

Abstract submission

MITM6 – (Exo-)planetary magnetospheres

The emphasis of the session is on all aspects of plasma physics and interactions of solar and stellar wind interactions with planets and exoplanets, including: (a) magnetospheric dynamics, aurorae, and radio emissions (b) potential impact of star-(exo-)planet coupling on habitability, (c) comparative studies between Solar System planets and exoplanets. We welcome contributions relying on space-based or ground-based observations as well as theoretical modelling and simulations.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41604 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Corentin Louis | Co-convener: Nicolas André

Abstract submission

MITM7 – Developments in the detection and characterization of planetary atmospheres

The study of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres involves a wide range of techniques and disciplines which provide crucial information about their vertical layering, their dynamics and chemistry, the role of condensable species in their meteorology. It is also a key contribution to the understanding of planet and moon climates and of their potential as habitable worlds, particularly in the case of exoplanets. The techniques involved in such investigations include, among other, ground-based telescopic observations, computer simulations and numerical models, and direct spacecraft observations (orbiters, landers, entry probes). 
We welcome presentations reviewing the current state-of-the-art techniques for the observation and investigation of (exo-)planetary atmospheres (composition, chemistry, dynamics), discussing the technical challenges and recent developments, and the implications for the potential habitability of exoplanet candidates.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41605 

Co-organized by TP/OPS/EXO

Convener: Michel Blanc | Co-conveners: Manuel Scherf, Thomas Smith

Abstract submission

OPS5 – Aerosols and clouds in planetary atmospheres

Atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles are found in every atmosphere of the solar system, as well as, in exoplanets. Depending on their size, shape, chemical composition, latent heat, and distribution, their effect on the radiation budget varies drastically and is difficult to predict. When organic, aerosols also carry a strong prebiotic interest reinforced by the presence of heavy atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur.

The aim of the session is to gather presentations on these complex objects for both terrestrial and giant planet atmospheres, including the special cases of Titan’s and Pluto’s hazy atmospheres. All research aspects from their production and evolution processes, their observation/detection, to their fate and atmospheric impact are welcomed, including laboratory investigations and modeling.

Sharehttps://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/session/41680 

Co-organized by TP/EXO

Convener: Panayotis Lavvas | Co-conveners: Nathalie Carrasco, Anni Määttänen

Abstract submission

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of SB (Small Bodies) sessions

Submit your abstracts for EPSC2021 before 26 May: Reminder of SB (Small Bodies) sessions

SB1 | SB3 | SB4 | SB5 | SB6 | SB7 | SB9 | SB10 | SB11 | TP1

The coordinators of the EPSC2021 Small Bodies (SB) program invite scientists to participate in the congress, submit contributions about comets, KBOs, rings, asteroids, meteorites, dust science and share their research with colleagues and friends. This year we have organised a rich program which includes the following sessions:

SB1 – Surface and interiors of small bodies and meteorite parent bodies: thermal properties and evolution

The asteroids in particular and the asteroid-comet-dwarf planet continuum in general bear the signature of the birth of the solar system. Their observed properties allow for testing theories regarding the evolution of the solar system’s planetary objects and of their prospective development. Additional important insights into this exciting field of research are provided by the laboratory investigations of the samples delivered to the Earth in the form of meteorites and by sophisticated numerical models. The session will gather researchers of different communities for a better understanding of the evolution and properties of small bodies, in particular the parent bodies of meteorites. It will address recent progresses made on physical and chemical properties of these objects, their interrelations and their evolutionary paths by observational, experimental, and theoretical approaches. We welcome contributions on the studies of the processes on and the evolution of specific parent bodies of meteorites, investigations across the continuum of small bodies, including comets, ranging from local and short-term to global and long-term (thermal and thermochemical) processes, studies of the surface dynamics on small bodies, studies of exogenous and endogenous driving forces of the processes involved, as well as statistical and numerical impact models for small bodies observed closely within recent space missions (e.g., Hayabusa2, New Horizons, OSIRIS-REx).

Convener: Wladimir Neumann | Co-conveners: Marco Delbo, Sabrina Schwinger

Abstract submission

SB3 – Laboratory measurements supporting modelling of early solar system processes and small bodies missions

This session aims to highlight new challenges and the missing building blocks needed to understand the composition and physical properties of the material of primitive bodies, using laboratory work on meteorites or other available extraterrestrial materials as well as terrestrial reference materials (rocks, minerals, ice, organics). Results of these laboratory studies with relevant references to modelling early processes in the solar system, including the formation/evolution of small bodies, and in support of ongoing and planned missions to study these objects are welcome. The session focuses on the origin of inorganic and organic matter in different astrophysical environments and welcomes contributions on laboratory investigations and models of parent bodies of various meteorite groups, IDPs, asteroids, comets and dwarf planets.
This includes experimental work on the composition and physical properties of dust regoliths, the observation and characterization of laboratory analogues and resulting implications for models of small body formation and evolution. In addition, there is a special focus on organic matter (detection and evolution of organic components in the interstellar medium, observation and distribution of organic matter in the protosolar disk, characterization and evolution of organic matter in the primitive bodies and on planetary surfaces).

Convener: Gabriele Arnold | Co-conveners: Jörn Helbert, Eric Quirico

Abstract submission

SB4 – Imagery, photometry and spectroscopy of small bodies and planetary surfaces

Electromagnetic scattering phenomena play a key role in determining the properties of Solar System surfaces based on observations using different techniques and in a variety of wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet to the radio. This session will promote a general advancement in the exploitation of observational and experimental techniques to characterize radiative transfer in complex particulate media. Abstracts are solicited on progresses in numerical methods to extract relevant information from imagery, photometry and spectroscopy in solid phase, reference laboratory databases, photometric modeling, interpreting features on planetary surfaces, mixing/unmixing methods, software and web service applications.

Convener: Frédéric Schmidt | Co-conveners: Stéphane Erard, Maria Gritsevich, Antti Penttilä

Abstract submission

SB5 – Comets, Trojans, Centaurs, TNOs, & Interstellar Objects

Space and ground based observations of the small body populations in the Solar System are continuously reshaping our understanding of how these objects were formed and evolved. New data and theoretical advances, as well as the discovery of interstellar objects and extrasolar comets give us new insights on the physical and dynamical properties of small bodies. The goal of this session is to highlight recent results from outer planetary system objects (comets, KBOs, Centaurs, interstellar, …) that provide fundamental clues about the early stages of planetary systems. We aim to explore the continuum of small bodies and the overlap between different populations through a balanced set of contributions from ground based observers and space missions (e.g. Rosetta, New Horizons)

Convener: Jean-Baptiste Vincent | Co-conveners: Aurelie Guilbert-Lepoutre, Michael Küppers, Alessandra Migliorini

Abstract submission

SB6 – Asteroid observations and modeling: properties and evolution of individual objects and populations

Currently there are over 1 million asteroids discovered. Each month over 1 mln astrometric and photometric observations are reported to the Minor Planet Center permitting dynamical and physical studies. Owing to large ground- and space-based surveys (such as Gaia, SDSS, ATLAS) hundreds of thousands of bodies can be at least partly physically characterised. Those numerous, sparse and often incidental asteroid observations are balanced by relatively small in numbers but dense, targeted and accurate ground-based measurements. Those allow for a more detailed, tailored analysis, both in terms of observing techniques currently not available in survey mode (e.g. polarimetry, spectroscopy) and time spent on a single object. The aim of this session is to open the discussion about the contribution of traditional vs./and survey-like data to our understanding of the origin and evolution of individual asteroids and populations. Furthermore what do they bring-in in terms of answering the big questions in planetary science such as formation and evolutions of the Solar System, planets and other planetary systems.

Convener: Dagmara Oszkiewicz | Co-conveners: Irina Belskaya, Agnieszka Kryszczyńska, Anna Marciniak

Abstract submission

SB7 – Future missions and instruments for small bodies exploration

Co-organized by MITM

The space exploration of small Solar System bodies has provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of Solar System formation and evolution. Now that the Rosetta comet rendezvous and landing has passed and the Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-ReX sample return missions have finished their operations at the target asteroids, it is time to prepare future space mission for small bodies exploration. This session calls for presentations of the upcoming missions by ESA (Hera, Comet Interceptor), NASA (DART, Lucy, Psyche), JAXA (DESTINY+, MMX), and CNSA (name to be determined). Contribution about mission and instrument concepts for the more distant future are invited as well.

Convener: Michael Küppers | Co-conveners: Tomoko Arai, Andy Cheng, Gianrico Filacchione, Harold Levison, Jean-Baptiste Vincent, Xiaojing Zhang

Abstract submission

SB9 – Computational and experimental astrophysics of small bodies and planets

Co-organized by OPS

The goal of this session is to cover numerical simulations and relevant laboratory investigations related to the Small Bodies (comets, KBOs, rings, asteroids, meteorites, dust), their formation and evolution, and the instruments of their exploration. This session is specially focused on the interdisciplinary approach in the development of models (formal descriptions of physical phenomena), experiments (on ground and in micro-gravity), and mathematical simulations (computational methods and algorithms of solution) of various astrophysical phenomena: (i) dusty gas cometary atmospheres; (ii) volcanic activity on icy satellites (e.g. Enceladus and Io); (iii) planetary body formation (e.g. via pebbles growth), and planetesimal dynamics. This session will include an introduction and discussion of new and/or existing laboratory studies in simulated space-like environments and models, experimental techniques, computational methods that can address the results of analytical, experimental and numerical analysis (with respect to computational methods and algorithms of solution) on the above described studies.

Convener: Vladimir Zakharov | Co-conveners: Vincenzo Della Corte, Marco Fulle, Stavro Lambrov Ivanovski, Raphael Marschall, Alessandra Rotundi,Diego Turrini

Abstract submission

SB10 – Planetary Rings – Protoplanetary Disks

Co-organized by OPS/EXO

Thanks to the advancement of observational techniques from Earth and space, our knowledge of planetary ring systems and protoplanetary disks has greatly improved. While these two classes of objects differ by orders of magnitude in dimension and evolutionary stage, they offer a unique opportunity to investigate common dynamical processes that can shed light on the formation, composition and evolution of planetary systems. Although rings are common companions of the outer planets in our solar system, so far we do not yet have firm evidence of similar structures around exoplanets. In this respect, the characteristics of solar system rings can be used as a benchmark to tune ongoing exo-ring surveys. Conversely, high-angular resolution images obtained with new instruments such as the ALMA interferometer and SPHERE on VLT have revealed that protoplanetary discs are also characterized by substructures such as gaps and narrow rings. The formation of these rings can be explained by the dynamical interaction of the gas and dust in the disc with one or more embedded planets. Similar processes are also common in planetary rings, as revealed by the unprecedented spatial resolution of Cassini observations at Saturn. In this session we invite abstracts related to both theoretical and observational studies of planetary rings and protoplanetary disks, as well as exo-ring research.

Convener: Philip D. Nicholson | Co-conveners: Gianrico Filacchione, Linda Podio, Claudia Toci

Abstract submission

SB11 – Observing and modelling meteors in planetary atmospheres

More than 10^7 kg of extraterrestrial objects or meteoroids ranging in size from a few microns to tens of meters in diameter enter the Earth’s atmosphere every year. A small fraction of these yields free samples of extraterrestrial matter – meteorites – for laboratory study. The majority, which burn up or ablate completely in the Earth’s atmosphere, appear as visible meteors in the night sky. Recording meteor activity and modelling the process of ablation allow us to measure directly the flux of small planetary impactors. This provides the ‘ground truth’ for estimating present cratering rates and planetary surface ages by implication. The application of the latest observational and modeling techniques has rendered meteor science as one of the leading avenues for investigating the nature and origin of interplanetary matter and its parent bodies. This session will provide a forum for presenting fundamental results and novel ideas in this area and informing the broader planetary science community of the interdisciplinary impact of present and future work.

Convener: Maria Gritsevich | Co-convener: Eleanor Sansom

Abstract submission

Moreover, we have co-organized the following sessions together with other programs:

TP1 – Planetary Dynamics: Shape, Gravity, Orbit, Tides, and Rotation from Observations and Models

Co-organized by OPS/SB

Shape, gravity field, orbit, tidal deformation, and rotation state are fundamental geodetic parameters of any planetary object. Measurements of these parameters are prerequisites for e.g. spacecraft navigation and mapping from orbit, but also for modelling of the interior and evolution. This session welcomes contributions from all aspects of planetary geodesy, including the relevant theories, observations and models in application to planets, satellites, ring systems, asteroids, and comets.

Convener: Alexander Stark | Co-conveners: Hannah Susorney, Daniel Wahl, Marie Yseboodt

Abstract submission

EPSC2021 – Call for Abstracts

EPSC2021 – Call for Abstracts

The Europlanet Science Congress 2021 (EPSC2021) will take place from 13–24 September 2021 as a virtual conference.

The abstract submission deadline is 26 May 2021, 13:00 CEST.

The Europlanet Science Congress is the annual meeting event of the Europlanet Society. With a track record of 15 years and regularly attracting over one thousand participants, the Europlanet Science Congress is the largest planetary science meeting in Europe. The entire range of planetary sciences is covered through an extensive mix of talks, workshops and poster sessions and the event is a unique space for networking and exchange of experiences. 

EPSC2021 is the second EPSC to be held as a virtual meeting. While we look forward to face-to-face meeting in the future (2022 in Granada) we believe that virtual meetings are likely to play an increasingly important role in supporting our community, widening participation from under-represented groups and at the same time addressing the global challenge of climate change and reduce our carbon footprint. Building on the success and learning lessons from feedback on our first virtual meeting in 2020, EPSC2021 will have a hybrid format of live sessions and asynchronous scientific oral and poster presentations with an emphasis on live interactions and discussions. The ethos for EPSC2021 is to create a simple, flexible, and inclusive virtual meeting that provides multiple opportunities for interaction, scientific discussion, and networking.

The Scientific Organizing Committee of the EPSC2021 invites all planetary scientists to participate in the congress, submit contributions to the topical sessions and share their research with colleagues and friends.

The Scientific Organizing Committee of the EPSC2021 invites all planetary scientists to participate in the congress, submit contributions to the topical sessions and share their research with colleagues and friends. 

The current list of sessions is organized around the following Programme Groups: 

  • Terrestrial Planets (TP) 
  • Outer Planet Systems (OPS) 
  • Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling (MITM) 
  • Small Bodies (comets, KBOs, rings, asteroids, meteorites, dust) (SB) 
  • Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems (EXO) 
  • Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy (ODAA) 

Detailed instructions on the abstract submission process can be found at:  

https://www.epsc2021.eu/abstract_management/how_to_submit_an_abstract.html

The scientific programme and the abstract submission tool are accessible at: 

https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2021/sessionprogramme

Please browse the list of sessions and identify the session that most closely matches your area of interest; your abstract can be submitted directly to that session. 

You may see all deadlines & milestones of the conference at the following website:  

https://www.epsc2021.eu/information/deadlines_and_milestones.html

Please note that an abstract processing fee (APF) of €50 gross per abstract is levied and this is separate from any participation fees. The participation fees have been increased to cover the actual costs of organizing a virtual meeting (EPSC2020 ran at a deficit last year), but are still much lower than for past physical meetings, particularly when travel and accommodation are taken into account. Bursaries will be offered to support students, early career professionals, educators, outreach providers, amateur astronomers and researchers from under-represented states. For more details, see:
https://www.europlanet-society.org/note-on-epsc2021-fees/

A separate online request form for splinter meetings & workshops, as well as tutorials and tools for the online presentations will be available soon on the meeting web site. 

#PlanetaryScience4All 2nd Edition launched

PlanetaryScience4All EPEC-EPSC 4-minute video contest: Call for PhD students and early career researchers

Deadline: 1 August 2021

The Europlanet Early Career (EPEC) Communication working group is giving all early career researchers, including Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD students, involved in planetary science the opportunity to showcase their research through a 4-minute video contest called #PlanetaryScience4All.

All videos will be shown during a dedicated session during the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2021, which is being held as a virtual meeting from 13-24 September 2021. The winner will be announced at the end of the virtual conference.

#PlanetaryScience4All challenges PhD, Master’s and Bachelor’s students and early career researchers to explain their research project to a general public audience in just 4 minutes. The videos will be judged on scientific content, communication skills and creativity.

The winner of the competition will receive free registration for EPSC 2022, which will be held in Granada, Spain, from 18-23 September 2022. The winning video will be also shared via the Europlanet website, newsletters and social media. It will also be used to inspire young people in future EPEC outreach activities.

Find out more

EPSC2021 – First Announcement and Call for Sessions

EPSC2021 – First Announcement and Call for Sessions

The Europlanet Science Congress 2021 (EPSC2021) will take place from 13–24 September 2021 as a virtual conference.

The Europlanet Science Congress is the annual meeting event of the Europlanet Society. With a track record of 15 years and regularly attracting over one thousand participants, the Europlanet Science Congress is the largest planetary science meeting in Europe. The entire range of planetary sciences is covered through an extensive mix of talks, workshops and poster sessions and the event is a unique space for networking and exchange of experiences. 

The success of our meeting is founded on the excellence of the scientific sessions and as well as the session conveners. We therefore encourage you to submit session proposals through the conference website by 6 April 2021 at https://www.epsc2021.eu

Session can be proposed for the following programme groups:

  • TP – Terrestrial Planets
  • OPS – Outer Planet Systems
  • MITM – Missions, Instrumentation, Techniques, Modelling
  • SB – Small Bodies (comets, KBOs, rings, asteroids, meteorites, dust)
  • EXO – Exoplanets and Origins of Planetary Systems
  • ODAA – Outreach, Diversity, Amateur Astronomy

Similar to last year, the EPSC2021 will have a hybrid format with live and asynchronous content. The lessons learned from the previous event will be taken into account with more opportunities for live discussion and interaction, and the use of more user-friendly platforms. 

In this virtual format, active conveners are more important than ever in facilitating discussions and encouraging participants to interact with the scientific presentations and authors in their sessions. We will support conveners in their role by giving clearly defined guidelines, tools, tutorials and training. 

Europlanet Partners Present… The Open University

Europlanet Partners Present… The Open University

Beneficiaries of the Europlanet 2024 Research Infrastructure (RI) project used the forum of the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2020 to present their activities and research on planetary topics. In this series, we have compiled playlists of EPSC2020 video presentations to showcase the contributions to Europlanet 2024 RI and wider research by our project partners.

This month, we feature presentations involving researchers from The Open University, UK.

Grace Richards won the EPEC-EPSC #PlanetaryScience4All Video Contest 2020 with her video VOC analysis unlocking the secrets of Enceladus’ surface. Grace is a PhD student at The Open University. The title of her PhD is ‘The feasibility of in situ VOC analysis on icy moons’.

The following playlist features EPSC2020 scientific oral video presentations involving researchers from The Open University:

Details of the presentations:

Poster presentations

See video presentations from other institutions in the Europlanet Partners Present… series.

Find out more about Europlanet 2024 RI and the project participants.

Call for Nominations of Paolo Farinella Prize 2021 now open

Call for Nominations of Paolo Farinella Prize 2021 now open

** DEADLINE: May 15, 2021, 23:59 UT **

To honour the memory and the outstanding figure of Paolo Farinella (1953-2000), an extraordinary scientist and person, a prize has been established in recognition of significant contributions in one of the fields of interest of Paolo, which spanned from planetary sciences to space geodesy, fundamental physics, science popularisation, security in space, weapons control and disarmament.

The prize was proposed during the ‘International Workshop on Paolo Farinella, the scientist and the man‘, held in Pisa in 2010, and the 2021 edition is supported by the Europlanet Society.

The eleventh Paolo Farinella Prize 2021 will be awarded to a young scientist with outstanding contributions in the field of planetary science concerning ‘Terrestrial Planets and Super-Earths’, including work on the physics, dynamics and observations of terrestrial planets inside or outside of our solar system. The award winner will be honoured during the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2021.

For the 11th Paolo Farinella Prize, the terms and rules are as follows:

  1. Nominations must be sent by email to the following addresses:
    doris.breuer@dlr.de, acb@ua.es and david.lucchesi@inaf.it, using this form.
  2. The nominations for the Paolo Farinella Prize can be made by any researcher that works in the field of planetary sciences following the indications in the attached form. Self nominations are acceptable. The candidates should have international and interdisciplinary collaborations and should be not older than the age of Paolo when he passed away, 47 years, on May 15, 2021.
  3. The winner of the prize will be selected before June 20 by the Paolo Farinella Prize Committee composed of outstanding scientists in planetary sciences, with specific experience in the field. The Prize Committee will consider all the nominations, but it will be entitled to autonomously consider other candidates.

Previous recipients of the Paolo Farinella Prize were:

  • 2011: William F. Bottke, for his contribution to the field of ‘Physics and dynamics of small solar system bodies‘. 
  • 2012: John Chambers, for his contribution to the field of ‘Formation and early evolution of the solar system‘.
  • 2013: Patrick Michel, for his contribution to the field of ‘Collisional processes in the Solar System’.
  • 2014: David Vokrouhlicky, for his contribution to the field of ‘Non gravitational forces in the Solar System.
  • 2015: Nicolas Biver, for his contribution to the field of ‘Dynamics and physics of comets’.
  • 2016: Kleomenis Tsiganis, for his contribution to the field of ‘Applications of celestial mechanics to the natural bodies of our solar system’.
  • 2017: Simone Marchi, for his contribution to the field of ‘Physics and dynamics of the inner planets of the solar system and their satellites’.
  • 2018: Francis Nimmo, for his contribution to the field of ‘Giant planets satellite systems’.
  • 2019: Scott Sheppard and Chad Trujillo, jointly, for their contribution to the field of ‘The Trans-Neptunian Population’.
  • 2020: Heather Knutson and Jonathan Fortney, jointly, for their contribution to the field of “Structure, Physics and Dynamics of Giant Planets’.

Europlanet Partners Present… Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

Europlanet Partners Present… Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU)

Beneficiaries of the Europlanet 2024 Research Infrastructure (RI) project used the forum of the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2020 to present their activities and research on planetary topics. In this new series, we have compiled playlists of EPSC2020 video presentations to showcase the contributions to Europlanet 2024 RI and wider research by our project partners.

This month, we feature two playlists of presentations involving researchers from the Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (UPV/EHU).

The first playlist features interviews, splinter meetings and oral video presentations about Europlanet 2024 RI projects that involve UPV/EHU researchers:

The second playlist features EPSC2020 oral presentations on planetary research topics at UPV/EHU:

See video presentations from other institutions in the Europlanet Partners Present… series.

Find out more about Europlanet 2024 RI and the project participants.

Review of Europlanet Virtual Industry-Policy session at EPSC 2020

Review of Europlanet Virtual Industry-Policy session at EPSC 2020

This guest post by the Europlanet Industry and Policy teams summarises the Industry-Policy session that took place during EPSC2020.

A virtual Industry-Policy session was organised on 29 September 2020 as part of the Europlanet Science Congress 2020 (EPSC 2020), the largest planetary science meeting in Europe.

The session focused on:

  • Painting the landscape of planetary research in Europe – future missions and the role of Agencies
  • Industry – research collaboration for innovation: the benefits for society and growth
  • Funding opportunities; challenging decisions in the context of Horizon Europe in times of crisis
  • The essential role of space as a strategic asset for Europe
  • Raising awareness of the successes of European Space Programmes, in particular when it comes to inspirational science e.g. planetary sciences, and their potential for innovation

This was a high level event featuring among the main speakers MEPs, EC officials, agency representatives, SMEs and other stakeholders. 

The essential role of planetary exploration and the need to maintain generous funding for space programmes was particularly highlighted by the first speaker, MEP and Vice-President of the European Parliament Dimitris Papadimoulis. In the grim landscape of significant budgetary cuts announced by the EU leaders in July 2020 on the overall budget for science and technology, including space, it is important to highlight that: “planetary and space exploration is a human endeavor that encompasses scientific, technological and economic challenges and bears long-term benefits for society. It stimulates innovation, boosts technological development, motivates young people towards highly qualified careers and may lead to unique benefits for the planet”.

Dimitris Papadimoulis MEP

Space and planetary science, besides their own merit also teach us about our own planet and how we can live here in a more sustainable fashion.

“When it comes to green and digital transition, I think the space opportunities here are key for achieving it,” said Ville Niinistö, Finish MEP and former Minister of Environment, pointing out that space technology is about exploration but also about sustainability which creates benefits. MEP Niinistö challenged planetary research officials to give public decision makers more tools in order to make better decisions and reach viable solutions.

Ville Niinistö MEP

The need to establish a unique European space strategy was raised by Niklas Nienaß, German MEP, who stressed that: “we need to take the step forward from the science fiction side that we seem to be living in at the moment to the actual science that we actually have”. It is essential for society and politicians to realise how important European space faring programs are how much strategic value is embedded in space, to achieve more funding and establish a unique European Space Strategy. And for this to happen, we need more scientists to lobby politicians, as well as raise the profile of successful EU/ESA missions so that ESA (not just NASA) receives broader society recognition. MEP Nienaß also raised the important issue of science education proposing the establishment of a European Space Academy to introduce young people in all fields concerning space faring. 

Niklas Nienaß MEP

The EU space policy and funding current and future strategy was outlined by Michal Spiechowicz, of the Space Policy Department of European Commission’s DG DEFIS, who put an emphasis on the need to foster better integration with space assets, in the context of the twin transition that Europe faces. “The EU space programs support both the digital and green callenges: Copernicus to monitor and map Earth, land, seas, and atmosphere, and Galileo, to help us navigate and position. They are in fact, nothing else than global-scale, autonomous European digital infrastructures.” The third EU priority being resilience, Mr Spiechowicz mentioned that, if we work on an ambitious project of secure connectivity by satellites, within five to seven years we could have an alternative European infrastructure that would drastically enhance Europe’s resilience. He also mentioned several upcoming funding opportunities for the space industry in the post-covid context. EU members states could embed data services in their national reform, recovery and resilience programmes, this would enable them to apply for funds under EU Regional and Structural funds.

Michal Spiechowicz, DG DEFIS

Fabio Favata from ESA highlighted Europe’s vast capabilities in science and industry. He noted ESA does regular industry days and showcases for member states, and builds up a portfolio of industrial capabilities. As an example, In Hungary, Tamas Bárczy from Admatis Ltd. who has been involved in three ESA missions, presented an association of 45 SMEs in the space sector called HUNSPACE. Fabio Favata also commented that academics shouldn’t feel reserved about speaking with industries and to initiate collaborations; there are great synergies in the skillsets repective to each domain. 

Fabio Favata, ESA
Tamas Bárczy, Admatis Ltd

The virtual session featured several examples of successful Industry-Academia collaborations. Jörn Helbert, the Department Head of Planetary Laboratories of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), highlighted quite a few: A Berlin facility to do measurements at very high temperatures, funded by the Europlanet 2020 RI project, is an extremely valuable asset for planetary scientists to measure the hot surface of Mercury and the even hotter surface of Venus, look at volcanic surfaces on Jupiter’s moon, Io, etc. And inversely, an example of a direct spin-off from astrobiology research: a team of scientists who are studying the effects of humidity on microbes, so basically how would potential life survive on Mars, are now also working with two small SMEs, developing a trace humidity generator that will be used for industrial applications. He highlighted the two-way nature of this collaboration, with commercial customers using a university facility that contains SME-built equipment. 

Jörn Helbert, DLR

In a similar manner, Giovanni Martucci (ALTEC) highlighted the value of collaborations between planetary science missions and industry, with the example of ALTEC providing operational support to ESA missions, with a co-located team at the ExoMars ROCC facility.

Giovanni Martucci (ALTEC)

Finally, Jeronimo Bernard-Salas, from one of our partner companies ACRI-ST, showed that collaborations with academic networks can lead to direct funding, with the success of the H2020 EXPLORE program selection, containing multiple Europlanet member organisations. This programme is based on collaborations with the planetary science community on exploitation of space science data including through the use of machine learning. Jeronimo also highlighted the potential for industry collaborations to valorise academic research, and open the door for new funding opportunities.

Jeronimo Bernard-Salas, ACRI-ST

A debate has followed the main deliberations, focusing on how Europe’s Planetary Exploration programme can drive innovation and competitiveness in European Research, Industry and SMEs, impact the society and inspire the next generation of Europe’s STEM workforce. The debate was moderated by Nigel Mason and it was possible for viewers to submit questions via the Q&A facility on Zoom. The questions, addressed mostly to the MEPs another policy speakers, concerned a range of subjects such as: best practices for scientists to lobby politicians and the underlying issue of lobbying time conflicting with research priorities, University Master programmes on space as an opportunity for collaboration with industry, or the organisation of large-scale space education opportunities with EU support.

The virtual event was very well attended by ~100 participants. The recording of the full session can be found here.

Europlanet Industry

Europlanet Policy

#InspiredByOtherWorlds: the winners are…

#InspiredByOtherWorlds Arts contest 2020: the winners are…

The winning artworks for the #InspiredByOtherWorlds Arts Contest 2020 were announced during a virtual award ceremony on 22nd December. The winners are listed below. Many congratulations to all the winning artists and thanks to all participant for their submissions.

Public Vote (Youth, Adult and Overall Winners) | Judges Choice (Youth, Adult) | Special Prizes (Group, Collection, Multimedia, Art Synergy)

View all the entries to the contest or watch the recording of the awards ceremony.

Public Vote: Overall Winner

Public Vote: Youth Category

Public Vote: Adult Category


Judges Choice: Youth Category

Judges Choice: Adult Category


Special Prize: Group Contribution

Special Prize: Collection of works

Special Prize: Multimedia film

Special Prize: Art Synergy


Awards Cermony

Back to #InspiredByOtherWorlds Contest main page

Public vote now open for #InspiredByOtherWorlds Arts Contest

Public vote now open for #InspiredByOtherWorlds Arts Contest: People’s Choice for best artwork

The vote closed on 16 December. The results will be announced in a webinar on 22 December at 16:00 CET.

As part of the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2020, the #InspiredByOtherWorlds Arts Contest invited schools and space enthusiasts of all ages to get creative and share their artworks and performances inspired by other worlds. 

The contest has received 72 entries from artists, space enthusiasts and children from Europe, Asia, USA and South America.

We are now launching a public vote campaign that will allow everybody interested in the contest to participate actively in choosing the People’s Choice winners. 

Based on the variety of the received artworks, we have decided to designate three categories – Young, Adult and Overall Best Artwork.

Cast your vote now

The voting campaign will end on 16 December 2020 at 23.59 CET.

Please note: The title and author of the artwork can only be seen in the gallery, not in the voting form.

Shortly after we will announce the winners on the contest webpage and will organize a brief virtual award ceremony where you will be able to hear a bit more about the inspirations behind the winning artworks.

Stavro Ivanovski on behalf of the #InpiredByOtherWorlds contest team.    

Call for Chairs for EPSC Committees

Call for Chairs for EPSC Committees

Deadline: Sunday, 15 November 2020

We are looking for volunteers to lead the EPSC Executive Committee, the Scientific Organizing Committee and the Virtual Organizing Committee for upcoming Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) meetings in 2021-2024.

Specifically, we are looking for volunteers to fill the following positions:

EPSC Executive Committee

  • A Chair for the EPSC Executive Committee to serve for the 2021 and 2022 meetings.
  • A Vice-Chair for the EPSC Executive Committee to serve for the 2021 and 2022 meetings. (The Vice-Chair will be invited to serve as the Chair for the 2023 and 2024 meetings).

For more information, please see the EPSC Executive Committee Terms of Reference and the Job Description for the EPSC Executive Committee Chair. If you would like to put yourself forward for either of these roles, please fill in the application form.

If you have any questions, please contact the Europlanet Society Executive Board.

Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC)

  • Two Co-Chairs for the EPSC Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) to serve for the 2021 and 2022 meetings.
  • Two Co-Chairs for the EPSC SOC to serve for the 2023 and 2024 meetings.

(Ideally a SOC Co-Chair from 2021-22 should remain as Outgoing SOC Chair in 2023 to ensure a smooth handover)

For more information, please see the EPSC SOC Terms of Reference and the Job Description for the EPSC SOC Chair. If you would like to put yourself forward for any of these roles, please fill in the application form.

If you have any questions, please contact the Europlanet Society Executive Board.

Virtual Organizing Committee (VOC)

  • A Chair for the EPSC Virtual Organizing Committee (VOC) to serve for the 2021 and 2022 meetings.
  • A Vice-Chair for the EPSC VOC to serve for the 2021 and 2022 meetings. (The Vice-Chair will be invited to serve as the Chair for the 2023 and 2024 meetings).

For more information, please see the EPSC VOC Terms of Reference and the Job Description for the EPSC VOC Chair. If you would like to put yourself forward for either of these roles, please fill in the application form.

If you have any questions, please contact the Europlanet Society Executive Board.

EPSC Executive Committee Chair Job Description

The EPSC Executive Committee Chair is responsible for:

  • Together with the Europlanet Society Executive Office (ESF), the Conference Organiser, and the EPSC Executive Committee, maintaining oversight of the budget for EPSC and ensuring that the conference does not operate at a loss.
  • Convening EPSC Executive Committee meetings and ensuring that appropriate records and actions are maintained and circulated.
  • Leading the EPSC Executive Committee in supporting the SOC, VOC, LOC and Conference Organiser in the practical delivery of EPSC meetings.
  • Extending invitations to high-level speakers and guests at EPSC.
  • Updating the Code of Conduct and guidelines for EPSC.
  • Disseminating information from the EPSC Executive Committee to the community.
  • Ensuring that EPSC overall upholds the Europlanet Society’s Commitment to Diversity 
  • Overseeing incident reporting procedures.
  • Preparing reports for the Europlanet Society Executive Board on EPSC (including collated summaries of activities by the SOC, VOC and LOC) and overseeing evaluation of feedback from EPSC participants.
  • Leading the EPSC Executive Committee and Conference Organiser in preparing calls for proposals of venues for future EPSC meetings and overseeing selection process.
  • Liaising with the Division of Planetary Sciences in preparation of join EPSC/DPS meetings.
  • Liaising with Europlanet Society Committees and groups (e.g. EPEC, Industry and Regional Hubs) in preparation for Europlanet Society events at EPSC.
  • Organizing calls for any bursary schemes in collaboration with the Europlanet Society Executive Office (ESF). 

The EPSC Executive Committee Vice Chair is responsible for:

  • Supporting the EPSC Executive Committee Chair in the commission of their duties
  • Standing in for the Chair where requested.

Top

Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) Co-Chair Job Description

The SOC Co-Chairs are responsible for:

  • Along with the SOC Co-Chair and EPSC Executive Committee, defining the EPSC Programme Groups (PG) and appointing the PG coordinators that make up the SOC
  • Convening SOC meetings and ensuring that appropriate records and actions are maintained and circulated
  • Leading the SOC to define the scientific programme for EPSC, including the call-for-sessions, session programme finalisation, abstract submissions and scheduling (and submission of presentations in the case of virtual meetings).
  • Working with the Conference Organiser to confirm logistical requirements for scientific sessions (room and poster capacities).
  • Updating the Code of Conduct and guidelines for the SOC, Conveners and Session Chairs.
  • Ensuring that appropriate training is provided (for Session Chairs, etc.).
  • Disseminating information from the SOC to the community.
  • Ensuring that the SOC upholds the Europlanet Society’s Commitment to Diversity. 

Top

EPSC Virtual Organizing Committee (VOC) Chair

The VOC Chair is responsible for:

  • Along with the VOC Vice-Chair and EPSC Executive Committee, defining the VOC Committee composition and the responsibilities of individual members.
  • Convening VOC meetings and ensuring that appropriate records and actions are maintained and circulated.
  • Working with the VOC and Conference Organiser to define the virtual format for EPSC and/or Europlanet meetings, including the timings of virtual elements, the nature of submissions, the platform and tools utilized, social/networking opportunities and, where required, the integration with physical aspects of the meeting. 
  • Updating and advising on the Code of Conduct and guidelines (for Conveners, Session Chairs, oral and poster contributions, etc.).
  • Ensuring that appropriate training is provided for participants in virtual activities.
  • Reviewing, reporting on, sharing and exchanging good practice regarding virtual meetings within and outside the Society.
  • Disseminating information from the VOC to the community.
  • Ensuring that the VOC upholds the Europlanet Society’s Commitment to Diversity.

The VOC Vice Chair is responsible for:

  • Supporting the EPSC Executive Committee Chair in the commission of their duties
  • Standing in for the Chair where requested.

Top

Upcoming EPSC Meetings

  • EPSC 2021 will be held at Finlandia Hall, Helsinki, Finland, from 19-24 September 2021.
  • EPSC 2022 will take place at the Palacio de Exposiciones y Congresos de Granada, Spain from 18-23 September 2022.
  • We are investigating whether EPSC 2023 may take place as a joint meeting with the American Astronomical Society’s Division of Planetary Sciences (DPS) in San Antonio, Texas, from 1-6 October 2023 (TBC)
  • A call to host EPSC 2024 will be announced in 2022.

Top

Application Form for EPSC Executive Committee, SOC and VOC roles

A look back at EPSC2020

A look back at EPSC2020

The deadline for feedback for EPSC2020 is tomorrow, so please fill in the form! To remind you of what happened at the meeting, here are a few of our highlights from the meeting.

1. Our first virtual meeting. Although Covid-19 meant that we couldn’t meet in person this year, EPSC2020 was an opportunity to explore virtual meetings. The format for the meeting was a hybrid of asynchronous scientific contributions and a live programme to promote discussion and highlight offline content. Lessons learned will be implemented in future virtual meetings and to provide some level of virtual access to EPSCs going forward.

2. Science. Over 125 hours of scientific presentations were contributed in 762 oral talks and 274 virtual posters. All content will be accessible through the EPSC2020 website until September 2021, and there will be ongoing access to public videos on Vimeo.

Abstract breakdown by session at EPSC2020

3. Policy makers and decision makers. EPSC2020 Community events included a “Dialogue with Agencies” session with representatives from ESA and NASA, as well as an “Industry and Policy” session that featured presentations by Members of the European Parliament and the European Commission.

4. Early Careers. Early careers were centre stage at the EPSC2020 meeting with the Europlanet Early Career (EPEC) network and the EPEC-EPSC Working Group organising short courses, contests, their General Assembly and a dedicated Slack channel.

5. Prize winners. Many congratulations to the winners of the Farinella Prize 2020, Jonathan Fortney and Heather Knutson, and the winners of the Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement 2020, Sheila Kanani and Susan Murabana. You can watch their prize lectures here.

6. Diversity and inclusion. Diversity and inclusion on the agenda for the meeting included a dedicated session, a keynote diversity lecture, a short course on mental health and splinter meetings on widening participation and mentoring.

7. Industry. Fostering industry-academic collaboration is a priority for Europlanet. The “Industry and Policy” and interview sessions highlighted the importance of big industry and SMEs to the planetary field.

8. Daily highlights. “Where are you and what’s the weather like?” Dr Niamh Shaw gave a sunny start to every morning with daily briefings and interviews with members of the community. Discussions ranged from the Chief Editor of Nature’s perspective on the effects of Covid-19 on publishing to updates on Mars exploration and a European return to the Moon.

9. Outreach Outreach was an important part of EPSC2020, with activities reaching out to communities and schools in Europe and around the world. 110 schools participated in “Europlanet Goes Live for Schools“, and entries for the #InspiredByOtherWorlds arts contest have been received from Europe, the US, South America and India. You can watch the entries for the #PlanetaryScience4All EPEC-EPSC video contest and find updates on the Planetary Science Wiki Edit-a-thon.

10. Global community. The virtual format #or EPSC has enabled us to reach an even wider global community than usual. Our registered participants came from 49 countries and EPSC videos on Vimeo have been viewed in 67 countries worldwide.

EPSC2020 video views by region.

Live programme at EPSC2020

Live programme at EPSC2020

Daily programme and links to session recordings

Monday 21 September | Tuesday 22 September | Wednesday 23 September | Thursday 24 September | Friday 25 September |Monday 28 September | Tuesday 29 September | Wednesday 30 September | Thursday 01 October | Friday 02 October

Monday 21 September

EPSC Live events: Monday, 21 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR1 – Monday briefing. Upcoming highlights
10:20 CESTIV1 – Monday interviews: Welcome to EPSC. (Guests: Nigel Mason, Luisa Lara, Harri Haukka)
10:40 CESTSB9 – Laboratory measurements of minerals, ices and organic matter
11:00 CESTTP12 – Open Lunar Science & Innovation
11:20 CESTODAA1 – Diversity and Inclusiveness in Planetary Sciences
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE1 – Welcome and opening ceremony 
16:20 CESTPL1.1 – Life Stories – a career in planetology (diversity lecture by Amelia Ortiz-Gil) 
16:40 CESTCE2.2 – Life Stories: Q&A session with Amelia Ortiz Gil 
17:00 CESTTP7 – Ionospheres of unmagnetized or weakly magnetized bodies
17:20 CESTOPS2 – Ice Giant System Science and Exploration
17:40 CESTTP10 – Mercury Science and Exploration
18:00 CESTSMW2 – Juno Ground-Based Support from Amateur Astronomers (no recording)

Tuesday 22 September

EPSC Live events: Tuesday, 22 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR2 – Tuesday briefing. Upcoming highlights
10:20 CESTIV2 – Supporting the Planetary Community (Guests: Gareth Davies, Manuel Scherf)
10:40 CESTSB3 – Comets, Centaurs, Trans-Neptunian and interstellar objects
11:20 CESTEXO7 – Synergies between techniques for characterising exoplanets from space and ground-based facilities
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTFarinella and Europlanet Prize presentations and lectures
17:20 CESTTP11 – Venus Science and Exploration
17:40 CESTSB10 – Physical properties of small bodies: processes and space materials
18:00 CESTSMW5 Planetary Science Wiki Edit- a-thon

Wednesday 23 September

EPSC Live events: Wednesday, 22 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR3 – Wednesday briefing. Upcoming highlights
10:20 CESTIV3 – BepiColombo, Mercury and Venus flyby. (Guests: Johannes Benkhoff, Javier Peralta, Ricardo Hueso)
10:40 CESTSB4 – Surface and interior dynamics of asteroids and meteorite parent bodies
11:00 CESTMITM12 – Future instruments and sustainable outposts for deep space, Moon and Mars
11:20 CESTODAA2 – Open planetary science for effective knowledge co-creation and dissemination
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
14:00 CESTSMW3 Widening – How under- represented groups could profit from virtual conferences?
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE4 Short course: Scientific writing – a science by itself?
17:00 CESTEXO Keynote by Laura Kreidberg
17:20 CESTOPS3 – Planet Titan
17:40 CESTMITM2 – Nano to Mini satellite and dedicated instruments: a new opportunity for planetary exploration.

Thursday 24 September

 EPSC Live events: Thursday, 24 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR4 – Thursday briefing. Upcoming highlights
10:20 CESTIV4 – Thursday interviews: Science in a changing world. (Guests: May Chiao, Ken Hiltner)
10:40 CESTMITM17 – Polarimetry as a tool for characterizing dust particles: Observations, Modelling, and Laboratory data
11:00 CESTSB5 – Observing and modelling meteors in planetary atmospheres
11:20 CESTODAA3 – Professional-Amateur collaborations in small bodies, terrestrial and giant planets, exoplanets, and ground-based support of space missions
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTScience Flash
17:00 CESTSB Keynote by Daniella DellaGiustina
17:20 CESTOPS5 – Environments of outer planet moons: particles, plasma, fields and dust
17:40 CESTEXO1 – Formation and evolution of extrasolar systems

Friday 25 September

 EPSC Live events: Friday, 25 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR5 – Friday briefing. Upcoming highlights
10:20 CESTIV5 – Friday Interviews: Planetary science in the field and lab. (Guests: Giovanni Pratesi, Fulvio Franchi, Samantha Tistoni)
10:40 CESTTP16 – European Exploration of Mars: from Mars Express to ExoMars and beyond
11:20 CESTTP18 – Astrobiology
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE6 Short course: Developing the future of planetary science: Voyage 2050 and Comet Interceptor, an early career viewpoint
17:00 CESTTP Keynote by Ganna Portyankina
17:20 CESTSB8 – Small Bodies Surveys
17:40 CESTTP2 – Planetary Dynamics: Shape, Gravity, Orbit, Tides, and Rotation from Observations and Models

Monday 28 September

EPSC Live events: Monday, 28 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR6 – Monday 28 Sep briefing: Recap of week 1 & highlights for today
10:20 CESTIV6 – Monday interviews: Voyage 2050 (Chris Arridge)
10:40 CESTCE12 – Outreach showcase – Art exhibition and #InspiredByOtherWorlds entries
11:00 CESTEXO9 – Future instruments to detect and characterise extrasolar planets and their environment.
11:20 CESTEX06 -(Exo-)planetary magnetospheres
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
12:30 – 13:30Virtual Coffee Break
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE7 – Dialogue with Space Agencies
17:00 CESTTP3 – Multi-disciplinary perspective on coupled planet formation and evolution: from accretion to the present-day, from core to crust
17:20 CESTEXO3 – From Protoplanetary Disks to Small Bodies, Planets and their Atmospheres
17:40 CESTMITM10 – Planetary geologic mapping and 3D geological modelling: from collaborative efforts to infrastructure
18:00-20:00 CESTSMW12 – The Ariel mission for exoplanets and support from amateurs
18:00-20:00 CESTSSMW13 EPSC-DPS Allyship Meeting

Tuesday 29 September

……………………….EPSC Live events: Tuesday, 29 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR7 – Tuesday 29 Sep briefing (Guests: Marcell Tessenyi)
10:20 CESTIV7 – Tuesday interviews: Industry and Academia (Guests: Giovanna Tinetti, Jeronimo Bernard-Salas, Anna Szkulmowska)
10:40 CEST EXO4 – Exoplanet observations, modelling and experiments: Characterization of their atmospheres
11:20 CEST SB6 – Space missions to explore small bodies
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
12:30 – 13:30Virtual Coffee Break
15:30 CESTAfternoon session
15:30 CESTCE8 – Industry and Policy (Panellists: Dimitris Papadimoulis MEP, Ville Niinistö MEP, Niklas Nienaß MEP, Michal Spiechowicz, Fabio Favata, Jörn Helbert, Angelo Pio Rossi, Laura Gatti, Giovanni Martucci, Jeronimo Bernard-Salas & Tamás Barczy)
17:00 CESTPL6 – ODAA Keynote lecture “The growing extent of professional and amateur astronomy collaborations in planetary sciences” by Marc Delcroix
17:20 CESTSB7 – Space Missions to Small Bodies: Planetary Defense
17:40 CEST MITM6 Interstellar Probe: Pushing the Boundaries of Space Science
18:30-19:30+ CESTSMW14 – EPEC Social Event

Wednesday 30 September

………………….EPSC Live events: Wednesday, 30 September 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR8 – Wednesday 30 Sep briefing: (Guests: Arianna Piccialli)
10:20 CESTIV8 – Wednesday interviews: Accessibility, Diversity and Inclusion (Guests: Solmaz Adeli, Stefano Biagini, Melinda Dosa)
10:40 CESTMITM9 – Tools, Databases and Data Analytics for Solar and Planetary Sciences at the Big Data Era
11:00 CESTMITM3 – Upcoming and Future Planetary Missions, Instrumentation (including radio, optical and in situ)
11:20 CESTTP4 Impact Processes in the Solar System
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
12:30 – 13:30Virtual Coffee Break
12:30 – 13:30SMW4 – The Europlanet Telescope Network
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE9 – Europlanet General Assembly
17:00 CESTPL7 – OPS Keynote lecture by Tristan Guillot
17:20 CESTOPS1 – The interiors, atmospheres and magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn in the Juno and Cassini Era

Thursday 01 October

………………….EPSC Live events: Thursday, 01 October 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR9 – Thursday 01 Oct briefing
10:20 CESTIV9 – Thursday interviews: Mars Exploration (Guests: JA Manfredi, E Sefton-Nash, P Becerra)
10:40 CEST MITM8 – Planetary space weather
11:00 CESTODAA4 – Planetary Science Communication with New Technologies, Connection with Local Communities and Art Exhibit
11:20 CESTOPS6 – Aerosols and clouds in planetary atmospheres
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
12:00 – 13:45 SMW11 – Evaluation frameworks: What are they and how can they help?
12:30 – 13:30Virtual Coffee Break
12:30 – 13:30SMW8 – Mentoring in the planetary science community
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE10 – Short course: ‘Thriving and surviving’ – a conversation about stress, mental health and resilience at university
17:00 CESTPL8 – MITM Keynote lecture by Bernard Foing
17:20 CESTTP14 – Mars Surface and Interior

Friday 02 October

………………….EPSC Live events: Friday, 02 October 2020
10:00 CESTMorning programme
10:00 CESTBR10 – Friday 02 Oct briefing
10:20 CESTIV10 – Friday interviews: Back the Moon and on to future meetings (Guests: James Carpenter)
10:40 CESTSB11 Physical properties of small bodies: observations and techniques
11:00 CESTTP1 – General Planetology: Observations and Simulations
11:20 CESTCE13 – Outstanding Student Poster Award and EPEC-EPSC video contest announcements
12:00 CESTEnd of morning session
12:30 – 13:30Virtual Coffee Break
16:00 CESTAfternoon session
16:00 CESTCE11 – Highlights of Regional Hub activities
17:00 CESTTP5 – Atmospheres and Exospheres of Terrestrial Bodies
17:20 CESTSB12 – Computational astrophysics and numerical models of small bodies and planets
17:40 CESTOPS4 – Icy worlds and rings: Past and future explorations

Using Virtual and Augmented Reality in Planetary Imaging and Mapping

Using Virtual and Augmented Reality in Planetary Imaging and Mapping

Being a planetary scientist is not easy. Huge amounts of data are acquired by a wide range of instruments onboard spacecrafts and rovers, and still you can’t directly explore the places you are studying and experience real sizes and distances.

Fortunately, in recent years, Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) capabilities have improved greatly, providing scientists with new ways and means to visualise their data. An example of this is provided by the work of Stéphane Le Mouélic (Laboratoire de Planétologie et Géodynamique of Nantes, France) and his colleagues presented at EPSC2020.

The aim of our study is to allow the user to fly over or walk on planetary surfaces using VR techniques,” says Stéphane. “The instruments provide high resolution imagery (up to 25 cm/pixel and 40 cm/pixel from orbit on Mars and the Moon), imaging spectroscopy (the analysis of the reflected light at different colours, which gives insights into the composition of the surface), and altimetry using either LIDAR or stereoscopic techniques. Onboard rovers and cameras observing the landscape elements from different angles also allow the 3D reconstruction of local geological features of interest using advanced photogrammetric techniques. Our job is to investigate how this orbital and in situ imagery can be merged into virtual environments.

Using a VR headset to explore an immersive scene or to manipulate a 3D rendition of a geological outcrop, scientists can have a better understanding of its configuration and evolution – a story often related to the processes of formation (sedimentary or volcanic origin for example). It also allows a better understanding of the real sizes and distances (something difficult to evaluate in desert terrain with no human artifacts to provide a reference) and, overall, it allows the exploration of inaccessible remote places.

VR models can be rendered by different means, from web-based platforms for simple visualisations to game engines for more sophisticated analysis. Geological measurement tools such as a compass, telemeter, clinometer can be reproduced in VR to quantitatively investigate geological landforms.

The project is supported through PlanMap, a Horizon 2020 European project with a consortium of partners from Italy, France, Germany and UK. PlanMap is focused on geological mapping and 3D geo-modelling in the Solar System and produces a wide variety of cartographic products for Mercury, the Moon and Mars. The Laboratory of Planetology and Geodynamics in France, who contributes to this research project, is involved in many space missions on various planetary bodies (Mercury, Mars, Titan, icy satellites…) and has been carrying out several VR projects since 2013. Together with VR2Planets, a startup focusing on VR applications for geosciences and education, they worked within PlanMap to develop geological measurements tools for the Kimberley area on Mars and provide virtual rendering for geological mapping purposes.

For more information about the work, you can have a look at Stéphane’s poster presentation, Using Virtual and Augmented Reality in Planetary Imaging and Mapping – a Case Study, during EPSC2020 (https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC2020/EPSC2020-589.html), or visit the official website of the project: http://Planmap.eu

The immersion offered by Virtual Reality allows visualizing and manipulating various cartographic products; it offers a new potential for “geologic field trips” on planetary surfaces. Credits: LPG/CNRS/PlanMap/VR2Planets

Adriana Postiglione, EPSC 2020 Press Officer